Cinema Reborn – rare and restored films 3-7 May 2018 AFTRS

 

Cinema Reborn  3-7 May 2018 Australian Film Television & Radio School, Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park in Sydney, Australia

Cinema Reborn’s focus is on screen heritage and preservation. Cinema Reborn presents twelve programs of either recently restored films shown using digital copies or, rarer, film archived-sourced 35mm film prints. All will be presented following best practice in the presentation of archival or screen heritage titles, and will reflect the originally intended experience of their creators.

Cinema Reborn is intended to shine a light on the long history of the art of the cinema, the world-wide activity of film restoration and the treasures that exist in the world’s film archives.

Cinema Reborn will be offering subscription tickets to the entire program from 20th March 2018 via  Eventbrite.  Please note also that seating at the AFTRS Theatre is only for 140 people.

Full Program

 

 

07: CONSULTATIONS & PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

Week 7 is devoted to individual consultations and project development.

8:50-11:40   INDIVIDUAL CONSULTATIONS & CHOOSE YOUR OWN ACTIVITY*

11:40-12:20 WORKING GROUP UPDATE

*ACTIVITIES:

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT /EXPERIMENTATION (FREE-RANGE / BLACK BOX)

RESEARCH (GO5)

SCREENING: LEVIATHAN (LECTURE THEATRE)

SCREENING: CREMASTER 3 (G04)

READING: BRUNO LATOUR (2010) AN ATTEMPT AT A COMPOSITIONIST MANIFESTO

 

232_DMC GALLERY 8:30-12:30

ACTIVITY: Individual Consultations 8:50am-11:30am

MAT               AARON

8:50                Eliza               April

9:00                Blake F           Brittany

9:10                Liam               Rebecca

9:20                Toby               Hayden

9:30                Chris B           Andrew H

9:40                Christina        Jei

9:50                Emily              Blake S

10:00             Carah              Lee

10:10             David G          Alex M

10:20             Mia                  Zoe

10:30             Chantelle        Geoff L

10:40             Angus             Ceren

10:50             Dylan              Jessica

11:00             Angela            Olivia

11:10             Ryan               Noelle

11:20             Daniel             Alex P

11:30             Mark               Adam W

 

233_G01 Lecture Theatre 8:30-10:30

SCREENING: 8:45 – 10:15am Leviathan (2012) dir. Lucien Castaing-Taylor & Verena Paravel

232_G04 Computer Lab 8:30-11:30

SCREENING: 9:00 – 10:45am Cremaster 3 (excerpt) dir. Matthew Barney

232_G05 Computer Lab 8:30-11:30

ACTIVITY: Research / Essay

05: Gemeinschaft

ASSESSMENT TASK 1 DUE

Discussion

  • Thoughts on Biennale of Sydney – Superposition
  • Artistic Director Mami Kataoka statement
  • Review by Andrew Frost
  • Chosen artworks? Other venues?
  • Questions regarding Assessment 2?
  • Discuss research strategies
  • Outline expectations for Assessment 3 – 6×6 working groups, individual or collaborative projects

Activity 1. Proposal Marketplace

  1. Write TWO major themes of your proposed project onto the A4 sheet provided e.g. gender & cinema
  2. As a group cluster similar themes into six groups of six proposals
  3. Opportunity to shuffle groups

Working Groups

  • Discuss overarching group thematic
  • Spend 15 minutes each sharing individual project proposal and intentions
  • Mind map proposals onto a single sheet of paper
  • Agree on a draft workshop schedule:
    W5: 1,2,3,4,5,6
    W6: 1,2
    W7: 3,4
    W8: 5,6
    W9: 1,2,3,4,5,6
    W10: 1,2
    W11: 3,4
    W12: 5,6
    W13: 1,2,3,4,5,6

 

PROVENANCE

Personal What is your story? what right do you have to tell this story? Pedigree? Intentions?
Intellectual What ideas are you engaging with? i.e. theories and concepts
Creative  What influences your creative production? i.e. artistic traditions
Political What are the historical and social contexts of the research? i.e. governing ideologies
Material What is the physical dimension to the research? i.e. production technology and artefact

 

Seminar

(11:30am-12:20pm)

Modes of Production Part 2: Collaboration

The Modes of Production seminar series aims to both theoretical and practical trends in contemporary media arts practices. The discussion intends to compare and contrast the nature of creative production between (i) the single artistic author, (ii) collaborative or team based practices, and lastly (iii) organizational and institutional modes of production.

The Artist (RE-CAP)

Australia Council Report (2017) – how much Australian artists earn and how they earn a living
http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/research/making-art-work/

“The fundamental processes of creativity, the pursuit of an artistic vision and the passionate commitment to art that characterises art professionals—these things remain at the  heart of what it is to be a practising artist. For many artists the real challenge is to keep hold of these core values in such a rapidly changing environment.”

Making Art Work: A summary and response by the Australia Council for the Arts

Can artists earn a living from creative work?
Average total incomes for artists remain 21% below the Australian workforce average, and income from creative work has decreased by 19% over the last seven years.

How are artists’ skills and capabilities aligned with future workforce needs?
Artists’ skills and capabilities are considered to be among those least likely to be automated and increasingly sought in the workforces of the future.

 

What is ‘The Artist’ as a creative mode of production?

The artist in history…

creative genius, master of craft, cultural critic, philosopher, celebrity

The artist as an individual…

subjectivity, liberalism, existentialism, phenomenological, expression, “a unique vision”

The artist in their practice…

control, direction, clarity

 

Andreas Gursky (b. 1955)
Rhine II
chromogenic colour-print mounted to acrylic glass
image: 73 x 143in. (190 x 360cm)

In 2011, a Rhine II print was auctioned for USD$4.3 million (then £2.7m), making it the most expensive photograph ever sold.

http://www.andreasgursky.com/en/works

Rhine II provenance

Personal son and grandson of commercial photographers, art school, university professor
Intellectual Becher School, objectivity, typography, art history, photography, globalisation
Creative  Becher objectivity / typographies, advertising, fine art, photography, “when reality corresponds with the composition of a painting”
Political globalisation, objectivity, simulacra
Material art object, fine art tradition, largest photographic print possible, catalogues, art sales

 

Collaboration

Q: How does a collaborative mode of production influence provenance? For example, how would your proposals vary as individual or collaborative projects?

 

Q: Is a creative collaboration different from being employed by company?

 

Q: Does collaboration suggest a mutual interest in working with each other?

 

Q: Is collaboration inevitable or are some creative processes unique? For example, are Gursky’s relationships with his lab printers, photo-tech developers, or his peers at the Becher School collaborative?

 

Q: Why do we celebrate film directors as the creative author?

 

Collaborative method

  • Socratic method e.g. Plato’s Symposium

 

  • Dialectic vs didactic

 

  • Hegeleian Dialectic

 

Contamination as Collaboration – Anna Tsing The Mushroom at the End of the World (2015)

How does a gathering become a “happening,” that is, greater than a sum of its parts? One answer is contamination. We are contaminated by our encounters; they change who we are as we make way for others. As contamination changes world-making projects, mutual worlds – and new directions – may emerge. Everyone carries a history of contamination; purity is not an option. One value of keeping precarity in mind is that it makes us remember that changing with circumstances is the stuff of survival. p28

Case studies

Q: How does the collaborative nature or these case studies influences the provenance of their work?

Personal, Creative, Intellectual, Political, Material

 

Soda Jerkhttp://www.sodajerk.com.au/
Dominique and Dan Angeloro
“Formed in Sydney in 2002, Soda_Jerk is a two-person art collective that approaches sampling as a form of rogue historiography. Working at the intersection of documentary and speculative fiction, their archival practice takes the form of films, video installations, cut-up texts and lecture performances.” – https://www.acmi.net.au/events/terror-nullius/

https://i-d.vice.com/en_au/article/gyqeb9/soda-jerk-remix-cinema-history-to-create-the-best-movies-that-never-existed
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/mar/20/terror-nullius-review-dazzling-kinetic-mishmashed-beast-of-an-australian-film

 

Barbara Cleveland (prev. Brown Council)
http://www.barbaracleveland.com.au/
Diana Baker Smith, Frances Barrett, Kate Blackmore, and Kelly Doley
“Barbara Cleveland’s projects are informed by queer and feminist methodologies that draw on the historical lineages of both the visual and performing arts.  Their recent video and performance works are deliberations on history and memory as embodied action, as fiction, as mode of collaboration.”

 

ALASKA Projectshttp://home.alaskaprojects.com/

“ALASKA Projects is a Sydney based Artist Run Initiative established in 2011.
Situated across two disused spaces in a Kings Cross car park ALASKA Projects established an exhibition program that crosses visual arts, dance, performance, music and film. To date ALASKA’s achievements are born out of our core objective to support artists to realise dynamic and innovative work. A commitment to diversity is at the centre of ALASKA’s philosophy.”

 

Frontyard Projectshttp://www.frontyardprojects.org/
“A Not-Only-Artist Run Initiative. A pro-active, flexible space for practical skills-sharing, community cultural engagement and critical research. Our aim is to challenge, facilitate and nurture collaborations between people with a passion for culture and to build a more resilient and sustainable independent arts community for the future.”

 

ASSEMBLEhttps://assemblestudio.co.uk/

“Assemble is a multi-disciplinary collective working across architecture, design and art.
Founded in 2010 to undertake a single self-built project, Assemble has since delivered a diverse and award-winning body of work, whilst retaining a democratic and co-operative working method that enables built, social and research-based work at a variety of scales, both making things and making things happen.”

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/dec/08/assemble-turner-prize-architects-are-we-artists

 

DIShttp://dismagazine.com/
Lauren Boyle, Solomon Chase, Marco Roso, and David Toro

“Its cultural interventions are manifest across a range of media and platforms, from site-specific museum and gallery exhibitions to ongoing online projects. Most notably these include, DIS Magazine, co-founded with Nick Scholl, Patrik Sandberg and S. Adrian Massey III in 2010 as a virtual platform that examines art, fashion, music and culture, constructing and supporting new creative practices.
Since being founded, the magazine has expanded into an international community of writers, photographers, musicians and DJs. Recent ventures include DISimages, 2013, a fully operational stock photography agency that enlists artists to produce images available for private and commercial use, and DISown, an ongoing retail platform and laboratory to test the current status of the art object.
Across its various endeavors, DIS explores the tension between popular culture and institutional critique, while facilitating projects for the most public and democratic of all forums—the Internet.”

dis.arthttp://dis.art/

http://bb9.berlinbiennale.de/foc/

 

TeamLabhttps://www.teamlab.art/
“teamLab (f. 2001) is art collective, an interdisciplinary group of ultratechnologists whose collaborative practice seeks to navigate the confluence of art, science, technology, design and the natural world. Various specialists such as artists, programmers, engineers, CG animators, mathematicians and architects form teamLab.
teamLab aims to explore a new relationship between humans and nature through art. Digital technology has allowed us to liberate art from the physical and transcend boundaries. We see no boundary between ourselves and nature; one is in the other and the other in one. Everything exists in a long, fragile yet miraculous continuity of life.”

https://hrmos.co/pages/teamlab/jobs/cr0000081

https://quartzy.qz.com/1199864/digital-art-sensation-teamlab-will-open-its-own-immersive-museum-in-tokyo/

“Founded by mathematical engineer Toshiyuki Inoko in 2001, teamLab is comprised of artists, programmers, engineers, computer animators, mathematicians and architects who collectively ascribe to the descriptive “ultra-technologists.” As a practice, names of teamLab members are not cited in works, they have a flat organizational structure and emphasize collaboration over individual genius. They are also very particular about the spelling of their name (small ‘t,’ big “L”). Their mission is to explore how humans relate to nature in an age when much of our life is governed by technology.”

 

 

COLLABORATIVE PROVENANCE

PERSONAL

– Expression? Shared experience? Multiple perspectives, community/co-operative

CREATIVE

– diverse contribution / contamination, multiplicity, collaborative method (relationship to audience)

INTELLECTUAL

– co-operative, community, diverse contribution / contamination, dialogue (method), validation

POLITICAL

– validation, momentum

MATERIAL

– space, resources, skills, ownership?

 

 

 

 

 

04: 21st Biennale of Sydney

This week we visit the 21st Biennale of Sydney.

Remember that assessment 2 involves a critical analysis essay about an artwork on display. Your choice of artwork should be part of this year’s exhibition but is not limited to the Cockatoo Island venue.

As the assessment outline stipulates:

The focus of this visit is to examine the application of media, materials, and technologies in current media arts and design practices.

Choose one work that you feel strongly about and provide a critical analysis of the work: its intention, process, and outcome. Research the central ideas the maker/ designer/ artist is exploring, how he/ she experiment with existing and new technologies, and his/her evaluation of the work exhibited. You can begin by describing the physicality of the work in detail, the materials and technologies used, and the nature of processes. You may speculate on the reasons the artist/ designer/ maker may have made certain decisions in the works’ making. How well does the maker/ designer/ artist achieve his/ her ideas or intention through the work’s material manifestation?

The intention of this analysis to ‘reverse-engineer’ a work in order to understand how ideas are transformed into physical, material works through exploration, experimentation, production, and presentation.  Please refer to detailed assessment outline on MOODLE. The assignment will be discussed in class.

Find a template worksheet to consider here: MEDA301_EXCURSION_WORSKHEET

Biennale of Sydney travel – meet at Circular Quay Wharf 5 for 10:37am F3 ferry to Cockatoo Island ($6 – OPAL CARD)

Travelling from North Wollongong – catch 8:39am train to Central, change to platform 17 / 20 / 21 for city loop to Circular Quay

Contact: Aaron 0418652672

Media artists to look out for on Cockatoo Island include (but you can select any artwork from the entire Biennale):

Ami Inoue
Born 1991 in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan
Lives and works in Kyoto, Japan
Ami Inoue combines personal stories with an ethnographic approach, producing works that reveal the gulf between modern life and a more ‘primitive’ means of survival. When her grandfather abandoned hunting after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, Inoue inherited the practice and now documents her methods as a hunter living in the city. Her videos often feature tranquil images of nature contrasted with clinical urban scenes, suggesting a contemporary disaffection between the natural and human-made worlds.

Suzanne Lacy
Born 1945 in Wasco, USA
Lives and works in Los Angeles, USA
Suzanne Lacy is widely regarded as a pioneer of socially engaged and public art. Working across installation, video and performance, Lacy confronts issues relating to gender identity, sexual violence, labour, poverty, incarceration, racism, aging and youth culture. Often working in collaboration with members of communities and other artists, Lacy’s projects merge art with activism, generating dialogue and providing a conduit for change.

Nicholas Mangan
Born 1979 in Geelong, Australia
Lives and works in Melbourne, Australia
Nicholas Mangan dismantles accepted histories, often relating to geopolitics and the environment, reformulating them to reveal alternative narratives. Frequently starting from a single object or event, Mangan unlocks the complex dynamic between human action and the state of nature through a process of disassembly and reformation.

Dimitar Solakov
Born 1987 in Sofia, Bulgaria
Lives and works in Sofia
Working primarily with video and photography, and more recently integrating drawing into his practice, Dimitar Solakov is interested in connections; the bonds that exist between people, the relationship between human beings and nature, and the links between different ideas and belief systems. Examining our interpretation of the past from the perspective of the present, Solakov investigates the subjectivity of history and how information presented as fact can often be based on insufficient evidence and distorted narrative.

Su-Mei Tse
Born 1973 in Luxembourg
Lives and works in Luxembourg
A classically trained cellist, Su-Mei Tse grew up in a culturally diverse and musically rich environment as the daughter of a Chinese violinist father and a British pianist mother. Tse’s practice combines photography, video, installation and sculpture, often centring on music and the sonic potential of our surrounding environment. Considering sound as an expansive medium, Tse investigates the way visual acuity and auditory sensitivity can influence our perception of the world around us.

Martin Walde
Born 1957 in Innsbruck, Austria
Lives and works in Vienna, Austria
Martin Walde’s process-driven practice exists at the nexus of art, nature and science, working across a range of mediums to create works that are simultaneously experimental and analytical in nature. Exploring concepts of time and the way objects occupy space, Walde’s works are often realised through active participation from the audience. Communicating abstract concepts in a multitude of ways, Walde encourages the viewer to reconsider accepted ideas and question their understanding of the materiality of the world. Since the 1980s Walde has developed artworks that consciously exclude explanatory texts on the basis that the provision of instruction manipulates the viewer’s experience. By deliberately creating ambiguous situations, Walde introduces an alternate reality where control and authority must be renegotiated.

Wong Hoy Cheong
Born 1960 in George Town, Malaysia
Lives and works in George Town and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Visual artist, educator and political activist Wong Hoy Cheong reimagines and reconstructs histories in an effort to transfer power and authority to the marginalised ‘Other’. Working across a wide range of media, including drawing, painting, photography, performance and film, Wong’s practice is assertively political; permitting the existence of multiple versions of any one story, and suggesting historical accuracy is neither possible nor desirable. Within this framework, Wong broaches concerns in relation to colonialism, migration, identity and globalisation to produce multi-layered works that are speculative rather than definitive.

02: Media Arts Research

Jeff Wall, A Sudden Gust of Wind (after Hokusai), 1993

This week we delve into the practice of research. What are the different research methodologies and processes that help us position what we do historically as well as contemporaneously? How do creative practitioners establish dialogues with media and materials through research? What does material research look like? Exploring these questions will help define parameters for practice and situate it in the broader field of knowledge.

Yejiri Station, Province of Suruga. Hokusai

Yejiri Station, Province of Suruga. Hokusai

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MEDA301 Subject Information and Outline

Welcome to MEDA301 for Autumn 2018. This entry contains information and links to relevant documents you will need for the subject. You can also find this information on the subject’s Moodle site (with subject schedule and recorded lectures accessed via ECHO360 centre). A downloadable subject outline is available at the end of this post.

Subject Description:

This subject investigates the nature of creative practice through field studies and material research. It provides an environment for students to undertake guided research that encompasses historical, conceptual and technical aspects of Media Arts practice. Students are guided in their critical investigation into research processes through the series of class seminars. Tutorial workshops present further avenues for students to test and refine their technical methods and critical-aesthetic perspectives. In consultation with the academic staff, students design and propose programs of studies that develop their interests through research, documentation and critical evaluation.

Subject Objectives/ Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:

  1. Develop research literacies in both scholarly and practical aspects of Media Arts practice
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the broader context of Media Arts practice and a capacity to develop creative projects in this field
  3. Conduct a viable process of experimentation in an identified field of Media Arts practice

Subject coordinator/ Lecturer: Aaron Burton
Lecturer/ Tutors: Aaron Burton / Mat Wall-Smith

Timetable:
For current timetable information please refer to the online Subject Timetable on the Current Students webpage: http://www.uow.edu.au/student/timetables/index.html (select Innovation Campus)

MEDA301 2018 SUBJECT OUTLINE

MEDA301 Subject Information and Outline

Welcome to MEDA301 for Autumn 2018. This entry contains information and links to relevant documents you will need for the subject. You can also find this information on the subject’s Moodle site (with subject schedule and recorded lectures accessed via ECHO360 centre). A downloadable subject outline is available at the end of this post.

Subject Description:

This subject investigates the nature of creative practice through field studies and material research. It provides an environment for students to undertake guided research that encompasses historical, conceptual and technical aspects of Media Arts practice. Students are guided in their critical investigation into research processes through the series of class seminars. Tutorial workshops present further avenues for students to test and refine their technical methods and critical-aesthetic perspectives. In consultation with the academic staff, students design and propose programs of studies that develop their interests through research, documentation and critical evaluation.

Subject Objectives/ Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:

  1. Develop research literacies in both scholarly and practical aspects of Media Arts practice
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the broader context of Media Arts practice and a capacity to develop creative projects in this field
  3. Conduct a viable process of experimentation in an identified field of Media Arts practice

Subject coordinator/ Lecturer: Aaron Burton
Lecturer/ Tutors: Aaron Burton / Mat Wall-Smith

Timetable:
For current timetable information please refer to the online Subject Timetable on the Current Students webpage: http://www.uow.edu.au/student/timetables/index.html (select Innovation Campus)

MEDA301 2018 SUBJECT OUTLINE