Assignment 1: Alanna’s Thur Afternoon Class

Please submit a link to your Assignment 1 blog entry in the comments below.

Check that your blog entry contains the following (in about 400 words):

  1. One or more original works / designs that you used as your starting point
  2. The instructions (not included in the 400 words)
  3. Quality photographic documentation of 3 ‘executions’ of your instructions by 3 different people (in class or outside of class)
  4. An analysis of your process, including:
    1. articulating the form/idea that you were abstracting,
    2. how you think that form might be changed / affected by being translated into instructions,
    3. how you think that the form might be changed / affected by the physical medium (paper / glue / pen etc.) the executions are targeted towards,
    4. the identification of what worked and why, and what failed and why.

Assignment 1: Mat’s Thur Afternoon Class

Please submit a link to your Assignment 1 blog entry in the comments below.

Check that your blog entry contains the following (in about 400 words):

  1. One or more original works / designs that you used as your starting point
  2. The instructions (not included in the 400 words)
  3. Quality photographic documentation of 3 ‘executions’ of your instructions by 3 different people (in class or outside of class)
  4. An analysis of your process, including:
    1. articulating the form/idea that you were abstracting,
    2. how you think that form might be changed / affected by being translated into instructions,
    3. how you think that the form might be changed / affected by the physical medium (paper / glue / pen etc.) the executions are targeted towards,
    4. the identification of what worked and why, and what failed and why.

Assignment 1: Mat’s Thur Morning Class

Please submit a link to your Assignment 1 blog entry in the comments below.

Check that your blog entry contains the following (in about 400 words):

  1. One or more original works / designs that you used as your starting point
  2. The instructions (not included in the 400 words)
  3. Quality photographic documentation of 3 ‘executions’ of your instructions by 3 different people (in class or outside of class)
  4. An analysis of your process, including:
    1. articulating the form/idea that you were abstracting,
    2. how you think that form might be changed / affected by being translated into instructions,
    3. how you think that the form might be changed / affected by the physical medium (paper / glue / pen etc.) the executions are targeted towards,
    4. the identification of what worked and why, and what failed and why.

Assignment 1: Etienne’s Thur Class

Please submit a link to your Assignment 1 blog entry in the comments below.

Check that your blog entry contains the following (in about 400 words):

  1. One or more original works / designs that you used as your starting point
  2. The instructions (not included in the 400 words)
  3. Quality photographic documentation of 3 ‘executions’ of your instructions by 3 different people (in class or outside of class)
  4. An analysis of your process, including:
    1. articulating the form/idea that you were abstracting,
    2. how you think that form might be changed / affected by being translated into instructions,
    3. how you think that the form might be changed / affected by the physical medium (paper / glue / pen etc.) the executions are targeted towards,
    4. the identification of what worked and why, and what failed and why.

Assignment 1: Etienne’s Wed Class

Please submit a link to your Assignment 1 blog entry in the comments below.

Check that your blog entry contains the following (in about 400 words):

  1. One or more original works / designs that you used as your starting point
  2. The instructions (not included in the 400 words)
  3. Quality photographic documentation of 3 ‘executions’ of your instructions by 3 different people (in class or outside of class)
  4. An analysis of your process, including:
    1. articulating the form/idea that you were abstracting,
    2. how you think that form might be changed / affected by being translated into instructions,
    3. how you think that the form might be changed / affected by the physical medium (paper / glue / pen etc.) the executions are targeted towards,
    4. the identification of what worked and why, and what failed and why.

Week 4: Assignment Work

A turn towards materials

Sol Lewitt: Wall Drawing #47

As discussed in the lecture, Lewitt argues that “Conceptual Art” is first and foremost an act of intuition. Just as Lewitt intuited that areas of differing pencil intensity, achieved through cross-hatched lines, would make a visually engaging work, we ask:

What is the best way to use the materials we have specified by our instructions?

Last week we discovered that certain visual patterns may be interesting, but perhaps more importantly, we discovered that the way the drawing is executed has a significant impact on how those patterns come to life.

Pencil lines drawn too softly, work poorly centred on the page, border margins too small, sheet of paper too crumpled. These kinds of executions can inhibit the successful reception of a work. This week, we focus on specifying qualities of execution.

Assignment work

Exercise 1: Analysis.

Review 6 different sets of instructions written by Lewitt. Examine which portion of the instructions define materials and how to use them as opposed to defining visual patterns or orders.

Note your research and present to class.

Exercise 2

Make a list of all the possible materials you might use in your assignment. For example:

  • ink?
  • pencil?
  • paint?
  • torn paper?

Then make a list of all the ways in which these materials might be poorly executed. For example:

  • drawing insufficiently centred
  • folds evident when they should not be there
  • ink pen too light
  • ink pen too heavy
  • pencil lines hairy (sketchy)
  • pencil lines too straight (drawn with ruler when shouldn’t have been)
  • pencil lines too wobbly (should have been drawn with pencil).

These ideas should then be included in your definition of instructions.

Instruction Iteration

Review the instructions you wrote last week, and re-iterate at least twice.

Coding (if time)

Examine the below plotter drawings by Vera Molnar from the series: (Dés)Ordres, 1974.

  • Identify why you think they are visually rewarding piece.
  • what are the representations that they make, what do they remind you of, what do they look like?

Identify how the work was produced:

  • how many shapes are there in each unit?
  • how are they varied?
  • are there many different line thicknesses?

Then … choose one and reproduce it in Processing!

You might start by simply copying the below code,

// draw a window that is 600 x 600 px
// make sure it has a white background
background(255);
size(600,600);

// This is known as a 'nested loop'
// It involves creating a loop within a loop
// The outer loop copies items across to make a row
// the inner loop copies the row down to make a grid
for(int i = 0; i < 600 ; i = i +20){
  for(int j = 0; j < 600 ; j = j +20){
    
    // Here is a rectangle ...try changeing this line!
    rect(i , j , 18, 18);
    
  }
}

 

Week 3: Art as Instructions

 

Making of Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #797 at the Blanton Museum of Art

The idea becomes a machine that makes the art.”

Sol LeWitt

In Week 3’s workshop, we explore the practice of rule-based-art. We research known artists working in this modality, we execute some works, and we have a go at producing our own rules.

Research & Analysis

Find 3 artists who were creating ‘Rule Based Work’ or who belong to the movement known as American Minimalism’ in the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s . Identify one of each of their works, and note down the rule / rules used to generate the work.

Then note:

  • Most importantly: Why you think the work is successful … the visual idea, the pattern, the combination of colours etc.
  • The name of the artist, the name of the work, the year
  • Write down the rule that they have created (if it is a rule based work)
  • Find photographic documentation (if it exists)
  • Aesthetic value: Write down the possible realms of meaning that the work delves into. You may have to do a little bit of research to identify these.

I you are stuck trying to identify what the meaning us about, you might try following these simple guidelines:

  1. Write a list of all the representations that are made in the work
  2. Write down a list of all the questions that the work poses (i.e. the questions that enter your head when you are trying to work it out).

As a start, you might have a look at Lewitt’s work documented here: http://archive.fo/OAesu

3 Exercises (executing instructions)

1. Rule-based paper sculpture

(Idea taken from here: https://chloedraper.wordpress.com/2011/10/13/rule-based-art-2/)

  1. Draw a square, 6cm x 6cm
  2. Add a triangle (of any shape/size) to the side of a square
  3. Add a square to that triangle
  4. repeat steps 2 and 3 six times
  5. Cut the shape out
  6. Fold along every second line
  7. fix together (into 3D shape) using tape

 

2. Knots in 3’s

(from https://www.conditionaldesign.org/workshops/knots/)

In a group of 3, with 3 different coloured textas: do the following (see the video above)

  1. Elongate your line on both sides by looping it over and under a line of another colour.
  2. You may not loop your own line or the line you looped in your last turn.
  3. If you have no options left on one of the sides, that side is dead.
  4. When both sides are dead, you may place a new line.

(explore the other works at https://www.conditionaldesign.org/archive/)

Kaleidoscope: this is another interesting work from this site (https://www.conditionaldesign.org/workshops/kaleidoscope/)

3. Algorithmic drawing

  1. Draw 9 cubes (your best cubes, doesn’t matter how messy) in a grid of 3 by 3 on a sheet
  2. Shade in a different side on each cube. (only 3 cubes will be shaded … you can only see 3 sides of a cube!)
  3. Draw many parallel diagonal lines from the edge of the sheet … start at the top left corner (more or less) and progress towards the bottom right hand corner. Do not cross a cube. If you hit a cube, stop the line.
  4. Continue until a large part of the page is covered in diagonal lines

Writing instructions

Create 3 of your own instruction based works that are informed by the research and analysis exercise you completed earlier.

Ask yourself:

  • which visual forms seem to be the most engaging,
  • which visual forms manage to make a broad range of representations
  • why?

Create your own set of instructions, pass them onto 2 other people who will then execute them.

Repeat twice.

Programming

Examine the below plotter drawings by Vera Molnar from the series: (Dés)Ordres, 1974.

 

  • Identify why you think they are visually rewarding piece.
  • what are the representations that they make, what do they remind you of, what do they look like?

Identify how the work was produced:

  • how many shapes are there in each unit?
  • how are they varied?
  • are there many different line thicknesses?

Then … choose one and reproduce it in Processing!

 

Week 2: Abstraction of visual forms over instructions for brushstrokes

chinese-painting-bamboo-B5703

In this workshop we continue our exploration of abstraction as instructions. In this instance it is the technique of painting bamboo trees: poles (trunks?), sticks (branches?) and leaves that is abstracted into instructions.

Please note: these instructions describe a technique, not a completed visual work (as does Lewitt’s instructions). In other words, by following the instructions, we each re-produce the technique which does not necessarily result in a visually engaging work. By abstracting a form (bamboo) into a set of instructions (here documented by video), we are engaging in computational media.

We ask questions such as:

  • what is the relationship between the form of bamboo and the form of the brush? Does the brush inherently serve the shape of bamboo? And if so, does that mean that an aspect of the instructions are contained within the brush?
  • what would the original instructions have looked like? Were they drawings, written instructions or otherwise?
  • how would other forms be abstracted as instructions on how to use a brush?

Exercise 1

In the below set of videos an Dr. Ning Yeh (from Coastline College in Southern California) takes us through the steps, the instructions, for creating bamboo brush and ink drawings.

A masterpiece as easy as 1, 2, 3
(2:40 in the 3rd video below: Bamboo Lesson 3)

Follow the below video instructions for how to draw Bamboo using Chinese brush and ink.

” if brush painting is language, then the bamboo provides the alphabet ”  (0:25 in above video)

What do you think is meant by the above quote, and how might it relate to the concept of Computational Media understood as abstraction as instructions ?

Notice (at 3:18) the document and illustrations shown that provides documentation of instructions.

Perhaps the below video is also useful

Some photos from the wed morning class.

IMGP5874
IMGP5875

IMGP5889 IMGP5878

It was found that Eucalypt leaves could be mimicked by altering the instructions in 3 ways (see image below):

  1. the downward hanging leaves should be slightly curved (unlike the straight leaves of bamboo)
  2. the branches hang down (rather than point up like bamboo)
  3. the leaves should be of differing darkness

IMGP5879

Analysis

In the above exercise, the instructions were conveyed to us using a demonstrator demonstrating the techniques on a video.

How do you think the instructions would have varied if:

  1. they had been conveyed using paintings done in brush and ink?
  2. they had been conveyed using diagrams (not done in brush and ink)?
  3. they had been conveyed using text-written instructions?
  4. they had been conveyed by word of mouth?

Research what original form the instructions on how to draw Bamboo using brush and ink would have taken, and highlight any insights you may have discovered.

Exercise 2:

Step 1 (explore)

Research any Australian native plant, and attempt to reproduce that plant using Chinese brush and ink. You might try exploring:

  1. Eucalyptus trees (many forms of which have vertical hanging leaves)eucalyptus-leaves-250x250
  2. Banksia pods and flowers banksiapod65c556d42ccddcf75ae1a9f69ae2a1cb--the-angel-tropical-plants
  3. Wattle trees
  4. .. any number of other Australian native plants

Step 2 (abstract as instructions):

Turn your exploration into a set of instructions (which you might document as text + ink drawings).

Step 3 (execute instructions):

Exchange your instructions with another student, and implement their instructions.

Step 4 (discuss):

Together as a class, place each original drawing (the exploration) with its execution (another student who has followed the instructions), identify:

  1. those works which seemed to be particularly successful at capturing a plant
  2. those works where the executed instructions is very similar to the original (the drawing itself may or may not have a good likeness to the plant chosen)

Students then to discuss each set of instructions with the other student who executed them.

Coding (Loops and Randomness)

http://processing.org/examples/iteration.html
http://processing.org/examples/recursion.html

Open Processing. Copy and paste the following code into the Processing window.

void setup() {
 size(480, 200);
 background(255, 255, 255);
 noLoop();
}

void draw() {
 
 // In this loop,
 // X starts at 50, and keeps going up by 20 
 // as long as it is still less than 500 
 for (int x = 50; x < 500; x = x + 20){
    ellipse( x,50,80,80);
 }
 
}

NOTE:

  1. The syntax of the loop command!

Make a loop within a loop (grid)

Open Processing. Copy and paste the following code into the Processing window.

void setup() {
 size(480, 220);
 background(255, 255, 255);
 noLoop();
}

void draw() {
  // noFill();
  for (int x = 50; x < 500; x = x + 20) {
    for (int y = 50; y < 200; y = y + 20) { 
      ellipse( x,y,80,80);
    }
  }
}

Randomly vary one aspect of the copied shape

Open Processing. Copy and paste the following code into the Processing window.

void setup() {
 size(480, 220);
 background(255, 255, 255);
 noLoop();
}

void draw() {
  // noFill();
  for (int x = 50; x < 500; x = x + 20) {
    for (int y = 50; y < 200; y = y + 20) { 
      int diameter = (int)random(100);
      ellipse( x,y,diameter,diameter);
    }
  }
}

NOTE:

Configuring the random method will change things significantly. Control the randomness!

Reproduce one of the following

  1. Choose one of the artworks below and create it in Processing.
    1. Bridget Riley’s Encircling Discs with Black.
    2. Vera Molnar, Interruptions, 1968/69.
    3. Kazimer Malevich’s Self-portrait in Two Dimensions
    4. Georg Nees Mikadospielhaufen, 1969
    5. Frieder Nake. Walk-Through-Raster, series 7.1, 1966
    6. Frieder Nake – 105/130 (1965)

A.
riley_discs1970

B.
interruptions

C.
Nees_Mikadospielhaufen

D.
Controlled Substances Key Painting (Spot 4a) 1994 by Damien Hirst born 1965

 

E.GCA_ill56

F
nake1505

Export it

Export your work and post it to social media saying “I coded this up!”

Assessment 1: Analogue Coding

Marking:
Marked out of 100 – 25%

Description:
From weeks 1 to 4, you will be introduced to computational media through the concept of Abstraction – the translation of tangible or intangible things into a set of instructions. Select one two or three-dimensional art or design work and develop / interpret / re-invent the work by abstracting it into a set of instructional actions. These written instructions should be designed for a human subject to execute and should involve one sheet of A3 paper. Any range of other materials may be used in addition to the A3 paper: glue, pens, pencils, tape, rubber bands, dust, ink.

Your last instructions may involve something along the lines of: “take a photo of the piece of paper” (this would then be one of the photos that would be submitted to your blog)

You will have the opportunity to test your ‘code’ in class and improve on your instructions. Provide this set of instructions and its execution by at least 3 people, accompanied by a brief statement (300 – 400 words) that explains the approach and process of your instructional design, its successes and failures.

Due Date:
Week 5

Format:
Written blog entry (400 words) with relevant support materials.

The blog entry must include:

  1. One or more original works / designs that you used as your starting point
  2. The instructions
  3. Quality photographic documentation of 3 ‘executions’ of your instructions by 3 different people (in class or outside of class)
  4. An analysis of your process, including:
    1. articulating the form/idea that you were abstracting,
    2. how you think that form might be changed / affected by being translated into instructions,
    3. how you think that the form might be changed / affected by the physical medium (paper / glue / pen etc.) the executions are targeted towards,
    4. the identification of what worked and why, and what failed and why.

Assessment Criteria:
Depth and breadth of research engagement with lecture and workshop materials, and relevant references. Please remember, you will be getting better marks by articulating the success and failures of your process

  • Effectiveness in translating an idea into instructions
  • Aesthetic success in the completed work
  • Criticality in analysing the process of abstraction

Submission Method:
Online: a working link to your blog entry must be provided on the relevant submission post on Medadada.net by the due date.

Must Attempt: Yes
This means that if you do not submit a work, a Technical Fail will be automatically generated for your grade in this subject.

Assessment 2: Digital coding

Marking:
Marked out of 100 – 35 %

Description:
Create a Processing sketch that translates the selected two dimensional art or design work into a digital execution. This may or may not be a continuation of your first assignment.

The completed sketch can be static or dynamic. Supply your sketch’s written code (in Processing) along with your exported Processing sketch on your personal subject blog. It is essential to include extensive comments throughout your written code to demonstrate your understanding of Processing. Borrowing from existing software is permitted but you must limit borrowed code to less than 30% of your total sketch. Wholesale copy of code is easily identified and will be penalised.

Write a 150-word statement that explains how your sketch chose to abstract a visual pattern or design as well as how your experiment relates to relevant research and media artworks discussed in the lectures and workshops.

Due Date:
Week 9  (link posed to submission post before mid-night)

Format:
Processing sketch, source code, and statement (150 words) embedded into an entry on your personal blog.

Assessment Criteria:
Depth and breadth of research engagement with lecture and workshop materials, and relevant references.

Quality of code and comments in the Processing sketch.

Execution of concept in response to abstraction process in Processing sketch.

Submission Method:
Electronic submission via Medadada.net

Must Attempt: Yes
This means that if you do not submit a work, a Technical Fail will be automatically generated for your grade in this subject.