Submission Assessment 3 Thursday 9.30 – 12.30pm with Etienne Deleflie

Before you submit: please also make sure this is your tutorial class – class time and tutor’s name are listed above.

Your digital files (.mp4) should be uploaded to your Vimeo account. Create an entry on your personal blog that embeds your video into the post accompanied by your project statement.

Add a comment to this post. In the comment, provide your full name and a link to your blog entry – please check your link is working.

Submission Assessment 3 Wednesday 14.30 – 17.30pm with Aaron Burton

Before you submit: please also make sure this is your tutorial class – class time and tutor’s name are listed above.

Your digital files (.mp4) should be uploaded to your Vimeo account. Create an entry on your personal blog that embeds your video into the post accompanied by your project statement.

Add a comment to this post. In the comment, provide your full name and a link to your blog entry – please check your link is working.

Submission Assessment 3 Wednesday 9.30 – 12.30pm with Etienne Deleflie

Before you submit: please also make sure this is your tutorial class – class time and tutor’s name are listed above.

Your digital files (.mp4) should be uploaded to your Vimeo account. Create an entry on your personal blog that embeds your video into the post accompanied by your project statement.

Add a comment to this post. In the comment, provide your full name and a link to your blog entry – please check your link is working.

11W: On Jamming/ Push and Pull

The artist Allan Kaprow created the performance titled Push and Pull: A Furniture Comedy for Hans Hoffmann in 1963 where visitors enter two furnished rooms with a set of instructions to rearrange the furniture as they saw fit. This performance has often been re-staged and its basis used to generate something new: a collaborative work or a shared experience. Shown above is a dance work by colectivo deria rectifacdora created based on Push and Pull .

This week you will move into this dialogic space with your project, where you will disagree. It is important to recognise that the aim of collaboration is not to agree. In fact, disagreeing is far more productive.

Begin by setting up your work (i,e. your experiment from any previous weeks – it doesn’t matter whether you consider it unsuccessful). Respond to your installation/ experiment by moving elements around. With each move, ask the question  “what if….” (e.g what if I move this on the floor? what if I multiply this element? etc.)

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Submission Assessment 3 Thursday 14.30 – 17.30pm with John Harris

Before you submit: please also make sure this is your tutorial class – class time and tutor’s name are listed above.

Your digital files (.mp4) should be uploaded to your Vimeo account. Create an entry on your personal blog that embeds your video into the post accompanied by your project statement.

Add a comment to this post. In the comment, provide your full name and a link to your blog entry – please check your link is working.

Week 10: Experimental Documentary

10000 Waves

Isaac Julien, 10000 Waves (2010)

Lecture

In this lecture, we pick up on the thread of screen as an intermedia form that harbour the potential to expanding conventional documentary forms. We propose that the notion of ‘documentary’ can be re-conceptualised through the expanded screen mode. We speculate how expanded audiovisual experiences can pave the way for truth to emerge.

There is no recording for this weeks lecture. The presentation can be accessed here:

http://prezi.com/claxuyfnim3s/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

A Working Model of the World

  • WHEN: 5 MAY – 22 JUL 2017
  • WHERE: UNSW GALLERIES
  • ADDRESS: CNR OXFORD ST & GREENS RD PADDINGTON NSW 2021
  • HOURS: TUES TO SAT, 10AM-5PM

Blurb from UNSW Art Galleries’ website – please see website for public program:

From dioramas to dolls’ houses, atomic models to cloud-chambers, mandalas to maquettes – A working model of the world gathers together charismatic objects created to help us understand the world around us and imagine new possibilities.

The exhibition explores the way models are used to create and share knowledge. It asks how we use models to contemplate, experiment, invent and teach.

Presenting outstanding new and existing artworks alongside emblematic and evocative models borrowed from public, private and research collections, the exhibition stages a conversation between different forms of material thinking from many disciplines.

A working model of the world features artists who examine the role of models in human experience, and deploy techniques and forms of model-making in their work, including in the Sydney iteration:

  • Brook Andrew
  • Corinne May Botz
  • Ian Burns
  • caraballo-farman
  • Maria Fernanda Cardoso
  • Kate Dunn
  • David Eastwood
  • Emily Floyd
  • Andrea Fraser, Jeff Preiss
  • Glen Hayward
  • Peter Hennessey
  • Jo Law
  • Tony Mott
  • Palle Nielsen
  • Kenzee Patterson
  • Sascha Pohflepp & Chris Woebken
  • Esme Timbery

10W: Presenting your work

[Martin Molin’s detailed documentation of the making of his instrument: the music box here shows a demanding iterative process.]

As we go into further iterations of your project in week 10, see how you can respond to your experiences, positive outcomes, ‘failures’ of your  and comments generated from discussions in the previous weeks.

I would also like to build on some protocols, codes or ground rules that allow your teams to work more collaboratively. It is important that you find a way to work together. Assigning roles according to expertise or interests may work well. Remember that the objective is to explore the questions you are asking through practice. If you feel that the project needs to split into different streams of experimentation – it is important that you do this, allowing your team to present 2 or 3 experiments in one week.

Please remember to bring all your media and materials to class to work on in order to maximise your workshop time.

As a reminder, collaborative teams as listed as below.

Expressing Digitality: Textuality and Expression
Briana Williams, Lily, Teagan, Kate, Josh P, Kristine, Gabrielle

Multisensory Interaction: Light, Shadows and Displacement
Shaun, Joel, Banisha, Briana Wallace, Nathan

(Re)configuring Spacetime: Story-telling through Sound, Image, and Interaction
Meghan, Joel, Ahn, Clare, Kade
Maya, Jasmine, Jane, Kayla, Madeleine
Sam, Sonny, David, Steph, Chelsea, Chole S
Mackenzie, Robert, Will, Chloe I
Jade, Izel, Isabel, Hugh, Matthew L

Generativity: Difference and Repetition
Peta, Mia, Joe, Joanna, Paniti, Jordan

Molin is the key member of the Swedish band Wintergarten. He is well known for inventing musical instruments that performs his compositions. The best known is probably the Marble Machine. He has also gained a following on the detailed video documentation of his making and tutorials on his working processes. The music box (above) uses ‘punch card’ music roll that can be ‘programmed’. At the end of his tutorial, he asks if anyone would be interested in mechanising the laborious hole-punching process and this is what happened…

Week 9: Constructing Spacetime: Discontinuity Editing

Lecture

In this first of three lectures focusing on practices that deviate from conventional mainstream cinema, we begin by examining the concept of ‘discontinuity editing’. As the name suggests, this opposes continuity editing which we looked at in week 3. Soviet montage theory pioneered by Kuleshov, Sergei Eisenstein and Somebody amongst others is at the centre of discontinuity editing. We look at the writings and film works of Eisenstein most notably the Odessa Staircase sequence of his film Battleship Potempkin. We also analyse Dziga Vertov’s influential Man with the Movie Camera. We speculate on the legacy of Soviet montage theory in how discontinuity editing has entered mainstream cinema.

Lecture links: http://www.aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w9.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • introduces editing techniques that work with camera movement
  • Examines discontinuity editting
  • provides the opportunity for students to experiment with audio and video editing

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Week 8: Cinematography

Film still from Barry Lyndon, directed by Stanley Kubrick (1975)

Film still from Barry Lyndon, directed by Stanley Kubrick (1975)

Lecture

In week 8, we introduce the art of cinematography in narrative films. We look at the works of number of filmmakers and cinematographers including Luchino Visconti, Darius Khondji, Christopher Doyle, Clara Law, Gillian Armstrong, Andrei Tarkovsky and Stanley Kubrick. Our analysis focuses on how these images on screen create mood, convey meaning and construct a narrative space and time. We also explore the different practices used by cinematographers. The lecture argues that cinematography is an inventive endeavour where art and technology mutually transform through creative practice.

Lecture links: http://aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w8.html

Workshop

This workshop is devoted to the presentation and critique of your assessment 2 project.

Submission and presentation

  • Your final sound file needs to be uploaded to Sound Cloud, posted onto your blog with your project statement
    The link to you submission post needs to be provided as a comment to the appropriate tutorial assessment entries BEFORE your tutorial class

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