MEDA302 Process Diaries

Zema Chulio

http://zemarama.wordpress.com 

Ben Read
http://bread25.tumblr.com/

Gerald Cicero
http://geraldciceroo.wordpress.com 

TylerRose
http://tylerheycottmeda301.tumblr.com

Brittany MacKander
https://bmmedaprocessblog.wordpress.com

Sophie Young
https://sophielyoung.wordpress.com

Brooke Shay
http://bshay21.wordpress.com

Madeleine Pitt
http://mp883.wordpress.com

Harry
http://harryburk.wordpress.com

Cass
https://cab299.wordpress.com

Tess
http://tesstess15.wordpress.com

Sarah
http://sarahcheetham5.wordpress.com

Kristofer Evans:
https://meblogofpractice.wordpress.com/

Craig Holbrook:
https://craigholbrookmeda301.wordpress.com/

Georgia Matts:

https://georgiamatts.tumblr.com

Melaina Chapman :

https://meltedchapman.wordpress.com/​

Week 13 : Ethicing, Wrapping & Organising

Monday is our last class. It’d be lovely if we knew someone who baked…..I’d love it if we could bring a celebratory breakfast..

We need to get all the detail locked away on the exhibition front. PR needs to have a plan to print and distribute fliers, posters and invitations (Tyler has a list of VIPs). Curatorial needs to lock down final spoke allocation and get a map to PR – also have to ensure Panels are prescribed and written with enough time for me to copy edit them. Events and Management needs to fill out risk management forms and return to Felicia and arrange to get copies of RSA cards from bar people. Tech crew needs to lock off equipment list so everybody knows where they stand and we can deal with any potential problems.

The school has agreed to pay for basic expenses…the meda meta team has the details.

Bring your work in progress to install and explore in the latter half of the workshop – I want to see actual work in progress particularly from those whom I haven’t seen over the last week or so.

I will work and be in the DMC office on Mondays and Wednesdays in order to be available to you on a drop in basis from around 9 – 2.20 for the coming three weeks. The week of the exhibition I will be here and available most of the week. If you need me at other times email me and I’ll organise something. Please make the most of this resource and time. It’d be great if you could treat it as workshop time…set it aside to come in and develop your work – use the availability of Glen and I, space, and gear as much as you possible can.

Lets make some good work together…

Monday is our last class. It’d be lovely if we knew someone who baked…..I’d love it if we could bring a celebratory breakfast..

We need to get all the detail locked away on the exhibition front. PR needs to have a plan to print and distribute fliers, posters and invitations (Tyler has a list of VIPs). Curatorial needs to lock down final spoke allocation and get a map to PR – also have to ensure Panels are prescribed and written with enough time for me to copy edit them. Events and Management needs to fill out risk management forms and return to Felicia and arrange to get copies of RSA cards from bar people. Tech crew needs to lock off equipment list so everybody knows where they stand and we can deal with any potential problems.

The school has agreed to pay for basic expenses…the meda meta team has the details.

Bring your work in progress to install and explore in the latter half of the workshop – I want to see actual work in progress particularly from those whom I haven’t seen over the last week or so.

Next Weeks

I will work and be in the DMC office on Mondays and Wednesdays in order to be available to you on a drop in basis from around 9 – 2.20 for the coming three weeks. The week of the exhibition I will be here and available most of the week. If you need me at other times email me and I’ll organise something. Please make the most of this resource and time. It’d be great if you could treat it as workshop time…set it aside to come in and develop your work – use the availability of Glen and I, space, and gear as much as you possible can.

Lets make some good work together…

The plan for today:

1) Reflecting on where we’ve been and where we are going.

2) Discussing Ethics – we return to last weeks notes and discuss some thorny issues.

3) Project Development and Consultation.

 

Week 12 – Ethic and Ethos

At this time in the course last year Jo had been reading the early writing of Hayao Miyazaki and singled out this quote;

When young, nearly all of us want to be taken seriously, as soon as possible. Perhaps because of this we tend to overemphasise technique. In fact, many of those who have not yet taken the plunge into the professional world of animation tend to speak endless about animation techniques, or concentrate on gaining as much knowledge as possible about about the technical aspects of certain scenes. In reality, however, once you enter this industry, the techniques required to make animation can be mastered very quickly.

Sometimes high school students and others ask me whether they should first go to college, or start working as animators right away. When asked, I respond as follows: It doesn’t matter so just go to college. Go to college and, while enjoying four years of student life, study art if you really want to.

How do you read this advice?

As most of you are well into your final year of study and perhaps have ambition to join an industry, what are your thoughts about your time and experience in tertiary education?

What did you expect to receive from the university? Why?

Perhaps that might lead us to another set of questions that can sometimes be quite difficult/uncomfortable to confront.

Lets work in small groups to tease out some answers…

Why are you here? (This morning, this course, for your degree)

Why Art/Media/Communications? Over say Economics/Marketing/Law

Why your particular medium?

Why your particular practice?

What was the motivation behind those decisions to be here? To do what you do? To pursue a particular self directed project?

Reflections & Motivations

Many of these questions reflect back on an Ethics and Ethos within our practice. To simplify this we might simply think Ethics and Ethos as a set of guiding principles that frame motivate and shape our practices.

Today we will look at what the guiding principles of our practices may look like.

We will look at the ethics and ethos of practice as a way to further figure out what it is that we do.

In the first half of the course we discussed things like;

Craftsmanship: doing something well for its’ own sakeIdentity: does the doing or making of things contribute the sense of self?Skills: does the learning of skills contribute to self-confidence?

Ultimately these are tied up with the motivations behind our practice and practicing?

What is ethos?

Lets look at some classical references;

The term ethos is tightly bound to the notion of character – for Aristotle ethos was one of three modes of persuasion or artistic proofs alongside pathos and logos – in Aristotle’s rhetoric ethos was one method among three for getting the audience to go with you.

ethos persuasion based on the perception of moral character.

pathos persuasion by appealing to emotion

logos persuasion by appeal to argument/reason

In addition Aristotle would break Ethos down into three categories;

phronesis – practical skills or wisdom (According to Socrates phronesis equals virtue – it allows a person to have moral or ethical strength – whats with that? think back to logos and pathos perhaps – what is the relation between practical skills and wisdom on the one hand and virtue on the other?)

arete – virtue goodness (which might be translated as excellence – and is often thought in terms of the fulfilment of potential or function)

eunoia – In rhetoric this is the goodwill between speaker and audience and the condition of receptivity. But Aristotle also use it to describe the attitude of the benevolent spouse. Its root includes the word for “good” or “well” and “mind” or “spirit”. So at once it seems to describe a speaker having the interests of the audience at heart (rather than simply their own) but also refers to a normal state of mental health – think about the meaning of the related term paranoia.

Are these categories simply archaic, only applicable to rhetoric, or might we use them to think though the ethos of our art practice?

How does each apply to your practice and its expression as a self directed project? How do these qualities speak through a work of art (think back to to those we’ve discussed in class – I argued that Turrell’s practice seemed to have a great deal of integrity – is it related to one or all of these modes of ethos?). Can you think of time when an art work lacked or compromised one of these qualities and how? What instances were you not convinced to ‘go withe the artist’ and why?

How do we use Ethos today – heres my the Oxford English Dictionary;

The characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its attitudes and aspirations.

lets edit that;

The characteristic spirit of an artist, practice, or work as manifested in its attitudes and aspirations?

What attitudes or aspirations shape your work (and how)?

What attitudes or aspirations are manifested in your work (and how)?

Are these the same? Is there a gap? Why?

To put these questions another way how does the Ethos of a work/your work or practice manifest?

Lets take it wider;

If our identity is derived from what we do, then these ethos or guiding principles are important not only to our work, but also our sense of self.

Are there times when your work or actions have lacked an integrity Ethos? Why? What was the result? How might things have been different? 

How do you perceive the ethos of the university or your lecturers? How do they perceive your ethos as a student? What is the relation between the two?

Question : What may some of the ethos be for what you do? Not just the practice you are developing, but also perhaps a job you may do for a living.

Ethics

• derived from the root ‘ethos’

• meaning: the best way to live

• when applied, we define action as right or wrong in the social context of a situation

• Ethics are the guiding principles for living and working together as a community

• Ethics may exist as a code or a system for a group of people (communities, cultures)

• Morals may be individual guiding principles or beliefs that guide us how to live our lives.

• Our ethics and our morals may not necessarily the same or they may even contradict.

How does ethics apply to art, craft, and creative production?

Case study 1: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the A-bomb

J. Robert Oppenheimer

• Theoretical physicist, and astronomer, university professor

• In 1941, he was invited to work on fast neutron calculations that supported the development of the atomic bomb

• In 1942, he was chosen to head the secret weapons laboratory for the Manhattan Project

• He established the Los Alamos Laboratory where the project was carried out

• At its height in 1945, the lab employed over 6000 people

• Trinity: the first artificial nuclear test took place in 16 July 1945 near Alamogordo

• Two bombs were used: 6th August 1945 on the city of Hiroshima on and 9th August 1945 on the city of Nagasaki.

• He is sometimes known as the father of the atomic bomb.

The Pandora Box narrative tells of:

• the relationship between human and technologies

• the danger lies in curiosity

• technologies as autonomous

• the destructive power of technologies lies in the hands of humans

Question: Do you agree? What are your views of this narrative?

Richard Sennett begins The Craftsman by discussing the ethics of craftsmanship using the example of Robert Oppenhiemer. The physicist’s diary shows that the destruction caused by the atomic bomb he helped create filled him with guilt. He alleviated this guilt by reasoning that the making was carried out by the scientists and the using of the technologies was later decided upon by others . Sennet argues that the responsibility of a craftsman should not be excused by the mind-matter dichotomy with Animal laborans, who is so absorbed in fashioning material things that

the world is lost to it on one side and Homo faber, the reasoning human maker on the other. The ‘maker of material things’ must have a thorough understanding of material engagement—that is not only the process of how things are made, but why they are made and how they are used. Reconciling Animal laborans with Homo Faber, Sennett argues that makers must ask the question why as well as how.

Questions :

•Should Oppenheimer be aware that what was asked of him was to create a weapon of mass destruction? As a Scientist interested in theoretical physics, should he be concerned about this?

• Is there room for objection on the part of the scientists in this situation?

• What is the responsibility of the practitioner?

•Considering the countries were at war, did the scientists face an ethical decision?

Case study 2: Hayao Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises

At a press conference in 2013, Hayao Miyazaki announced that The Wind Rises (2013) was to be his final film—an announcement he later retracted. Whether the film turns to be his last or not, there is no doubt the work would have taken great conviction to make. Five years in the making, The Wind Rises fictionalises the life of Jiro Horikoshi that leads up to his design of the A6M Zero or ‘Zero fighter’ constructed by the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries for the Japan Imperial Navy in 1940.

Given the historical and political sensitivity of the protagonist, the setting, and the central subject, Miyazaki’s choice for what he may have thought of as his last film may seem perplexing. In particular, he is known for his strong opposition to militarism and this includes his keen objection to the recent proposed amendment to the Article 9 of Japanese constitution to ‘forever renounce war as a sovereign right of the nation and the threat or use of force as means of settling international disputes.’ In light of his family background—son of an aeronautical engineer and director of Miyazaki Airplanes, a company that made rudders for the AM6 Zero—Miyazaki’s bold choiceof this subject for a work he has always wanted to make may not seem so surprising.

The Wind Rises is based on Miyazaki’s own 2009 serial manga of the same name. The film title is derived from Tatsuo Hori’s novel The Wind Has Risen (1936-7), whose story centred on a female patient in a tuberculosis sanatorium is woven into the fictional life of Horikoshi in Miyazaki’s work. Hori’s novel, The Wind Has Risen, itself is a quote from Paul Valéry’s The Graveyard By The Sea (Le Cimeère marin): ‘The wind is rising! . . . We must try to live!’. This senti-ment is also a leitmotif in the film. An interpretation of_ Valéry’s line is that one must seize the moment that is life.

In the film, the seizing of that moment is impelled by a dream and this dream is one that drives the artist. Miyazaki was inspired by Horikoshi’s statement, ‘All I wanted to do was to make something beautiful’. The fictional life of Horikoshi as imagined by Miyazaki reflects his own thoughts and journey as a craftsman. Through Horikoshi, Miyazaki presents a portrait of craftsmanship.

At the centre of this quest, however, is a dilemma—an ethical one. The wind that rises for Horikoshi was fanned by Japan’s militarism. After all without the Japan Imperial Navy’s support, the opportunity to test his ideas might not have arisen. Does the resolution to pursue his dream in this context mean a complicit role in war? Does his responsibility to himself as a craftsman leave him no choice but to seize the moment when the wind rises?

In making The Wind Rises, Miyazaki was attacked from both the right and left wings of politics. Some on the left criticised him for making a film about a man who created weapons; while ring-wing conservatives labelled him as a traitor, anti-Japanese for the anti-war sentiments in the film. (His work was also criticised by anti-smoking groups for chain-smoking depicted in many scenes in the film.) Miyazaki is revered for his craft of animation. His refined skills, developed and honed over decades, breathe life into stories. The magical abilities of craftsmen invite others to invest their hopes and dreams into the things they make. It is so with aeroplanes as with films. With this reverence also comes a great responsibility.

Read more:

http://www.scmp.com/news/asia/article/1296325/miyazakis-newest-film-soars-despite-criticism?page=all

Questions :

• Did Miyazaki face an ethic dilemma in making this work?

• What is Miyazaki’s responsibility as an artist?

• Who is he responsible for?

• Why does he have this responsibility?

Case study 3: The 19th Biennale of Sydney

http://www.biennaleofsydney.com.au/19bos /

There are really at least 2 controversies here.

Transfield Holdings

• Transfield Holdings was a founding sponsor of The Biennale of Sydney.

• The company is a shareholder of Transfield Services, which managed facilities in the Australian detention centre in Nauru and recently signed a contract with the Federal Government as a supplier of facilities for immigration detention centre on Manus Island.

• The executive director of Transfield, Luca Belgoirno-Nettis, was also the chair of the Biennale.

• Franco Belgiorno-Nettis, Luca’s father, was the founding governor of the Biennale in 1973.

• Matthew Kiem, from University of Western Sydney, wrote a public letter to visual arts teachers to boycott the event because of the highly questionable nature of Australian treatment of asylum seekers including in these detention centres

• In February, twenty-eight artists threatened to withdraw from the event if the Biennale did not sever its ties with Transfield.

• On 5th March, up to nine artists boycotted the event in protest.

• On 7th March, Luca Belgoirno-Nettis resigned as the chair of the Biennale

•The Biennale of Sydney announced that it will cut all ties to Transfield Holdings, and Transfield Services.

Read more:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/12/sydney-biennale-transfield-sponsorship

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/mar/07/sydney-biennale-chairman-quits-transfield-detention

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-11/biennale-sponsor-sickened-by-concentration-camp-accusations/5313604

Questions:

• Does the origin of the funding (how the money is earned) have a bearing on the arts event? If so, what kind of significance this have? If not, why not?

• Describe this relationship between the sponsors and the event.

• Was the Biennale right to server the link with Transfield Holdings?

• Was boycotting and withdrawal the effective actions to take on the part of the artists and audience?

• Were there other possibilities to resolve the situation?

Arts and funding

Further to this controversy, the federal minister of the arts, George Brandis, threatens the penalise art organisations that refuse fundings from corporate sponsors.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/13/george-brandis-threatens-sydney-biennale-transfield-blackballing

Many artists and art works disagree.Read about the views of some leading Australian arts festivals and companies directors:

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/australia-culture-blog/2014/mar/14/australian-artists-respond-brandis-intervention-biennale-transfield

Questions :

• What is George Brandis’s argument?

• What are the counter arguments presented by the artists and art organisations?

• What are the implications of these arguments in the field of creative production?

• In the research and scientific fields, it is necessary to declare commercial sponsorships on certain studies in order to show that there is no inherent bias in the research. (For example, when it was revealed that a major funding source of the CSIRO’s high protein and low carbohydrate diet came from the meat and livestock industry, the study was criticised for potential bias). How is this different in an art or creative production context?

Over to you:

  • Can you imagine a situation where you would not be able to provide service/ create a work requested by a client? That is – what you are asked to do contravene with your beliefs.
  • Think of one example where the production of work would be against the ethical code of your practice and one against your moral code.
  • What kinds of work would these be?
  • Do you have a set of principles that guide your work or practices?
  • If so, what are they?

• Would these principles also guide your fellow workers/ colleagues?

• What are you ethical responsibilities to your co-workers, audience/ users, funders/ sponsors/clients?

Project Development, Exhibition Coordination, Consultation.

 

Week 11 – Material Thinking

Check you SOLS mail…important information for those absent last week.

So far we’ve talked a lot about material thinking but not had too much of a chance to get in and play with the media tech and gallery space.

Material Thinking/Felling Inspiration from AntiVJ….

https://vimeo.com/111327577

This week and for most of next week we will be concentrating on that and that alone (Well, that and event organisation). You were all great last week and contributed very well and (largely) in the spirit I had hoped for. I will ask for more this week. Please bring you generosity and good will as well as your materials.

Inspiration?

Most importantly bring your materials! I know I said concepts are materials too…but…well I need some hard media art ,making material this week. The aim is to use the Gallery space, access to gear and to Glen to try some experiments or prototypes of your project. We have four hours or so (and the whole day is booked) so you have plenty of time to try multiple things….too much is always better than not enough…

As the Butthole Surfers said ‘Its better to regret something you did than something you didn’t do!’

Well …. um… maybe not in all cases- but you get the idea…

Bring Stuff to install or dance in the gallery space.

More Inspiration:

Finding Ground(s)? – Event Organisation.

We will begin with about 30 minutes of Exhibition Group coordination. You will have a little time to Get Stuff Done. That means compile and organise lists and maps for curatorial, organise preliminary gear requirements for technical, go through management requirements for events, ensure style guide is written and distributed for PR.

There is much else to be done as well… Its up to you to work out what and when by.

Once the groups are on their way the META GROUP OF INFINITE WISDOMS (Zema, Tyler, Cass, & Ben) should meet and ensure they have got a handle on everything and nothing has fallen through the CRACKS OF EVENT DOOM! This should only take ten minutes or so.

Material Thinking.

More Inspiration?

The rest of the day will be spent in the gallery spaces. I have a few more hippy improv exercises for you. We will work in small groups to discuss the experiments. We will empower free radicals to steal, deconstruct, and splice ideas.

Most of all we will help each other make our projects richer and more interesting by being honest and forthright….We are one, were are many….or something..

Thanks for coming.

Oh more inspiration?

 

 

Week 10 – Finding Ground.

Still from Ben Read's untitled work

Still from Ben Read’s untitled work

Today we continue with the planning and organising of our exhibition now officially called Finding Ground – reserve the date 24th June (6-8.30?).

We still need to work out what kind of event this is….. Lets do that now… How will we run it…
We decided last week we wanted it to be enjoyable (fun), a slick showcase (hard), we wanted the works to activate something… how are we going to do that?

Lets think with the green hat for a while.

Exhibition Committee Formation

Following are the 4 committees that need to be formed to organise and run the end-of-session exhibition:

1. Curatorial: looks after the artworks and allocation of spaces, generally how the artworks are exhibited.

2. Technical: looks after the equipment (allocation) and installing of the works or stipulating guidlines (e.g. deadlines).

3. Public relations: makes the exhibition known to interested parties, stakeholders, general public etc.

4. Catering and event: looks after the running of the event itself such as the opening and later if the exhibition runs over a few days the manning of the venue.

Nominate yourself into a committee that you are interested in working in. Gather, meet and discuss your following:

1. Goals: What is your purpose?

2. Roles: Who needs to do what?

3. Procedures: How are we going to achieve our goals?

4. Relationships: How will we communicate? How will we support each other in completing the task?

Post an entry to the subject’s blog that:

• Defines your tasks (what areas are you look after)

• Define your roles (for example, who should a student approach and for what)

• Define your procedures (including information you may require from participating students, deadlines).

Not-Presentations.

Exercise 1

Lets start by Jotting down two things;

1. A single research question that frames the practice out of which my self directed project will develop.

2. A 150 (or less) description of the project/practice as it stands.

We will start by trying a version of conceptual speed dating – although it won’t be for the reasons we discussed….In this case you will pitch your project – (this should be as close to a thorough presentation of your ideas so far as you can manage) and your research question and the person opposite must listen ask questions if required and the (using the green hat again) add another potential thought/concept/or element to the project. At each station you’ll brief the other person on the potential added in consult so far…

Exercise 2

Small Group Six Hats. You will present your project to a small group.
In each of those groups there will be a person responsible for thinking of the six hats.
In each round one person from each group will be nominated as a *free radical* it is their job to move to another group and ensure they are forced to thing outside the box – they will do so by taking an idea from one group and giving it to another – recontextualised for the project under discover.

Consult with Mat

 

Week 9: Lucas Ihlein & Planning

Lucas is over his Lurgy…and had kindly agreed to come in despite being very busy… please make him welcome.

Image from The Yeomans Project by Ian Mills and Lucas Ihlein

Today Dr Lucas Ihlein has been generous enough to volunteer to come and talk to us about the development and sustain of his practice.

Perhaps more than any of the artists Lucas’s work is concerned is made of process and relation and so he has really had to focus on the relation between art process, practice, and its artefacts or objects.

He very neatly describes his work thusly,

Lucas Ihlein is an artist who works with social relations and communication as the primary media of his creative practice. (http://lucasihlein.net)

Image form the Bon Scott Blog…

Luca’s work is part Activist, Environmental ,Social,  Aesthetic, and certainly Research – but its the dialogue that he sets up between those that makes his work particularly interesting. I certainly found myself think about those Biotypes when I was looking over his catalogue….the relation  between Art and the Civic is a particularly interesting aspect of Lucas’s practice.

He has really pioneered the notion of Blogging as Art and particularly the method of Bilateral Blogging  – which is the subject of his award winning doctoral thesis which you can find here 

or you can read a shorter journal article describing bilateral blogging here

I highly recommend you have a look at;

the Yeoman’s project which was exhibited to much acclaim at the New South Wales Gallery.
the Bon Scott Blog and much more listed here.


Project Consultation and Presentations.

There has been some suggestions that Presentations are not useful for the development of projects. I’ve taken that on board and think we will employ a combination of small group discussion/presentation/six hat thinking/and conceptual speed dating.

This doesn’t change the fact that you’ll need to have a presentation of sorts organised with some material ready to go next week.

In addition I think this might free-up week eleven. For that week I suggest a ‘material thinking’ week – in which we all install something or experiment in the gallery space as a means of trying out ideas in situ…

Discuss this in small groups – if you hate it – be prepared to put an idea up as an alternative or to defend presentations….


 

 

• Blue [Cool, Controlled, Analytical, Managing] asks: what is the subject? what are we thinking about? what isthe goal? what is our approach to this task?

• White [Objective, Facts, Figures, Information] asks: what do we know about the subject/ task? what are the facts?

• Red [Emotions, Feelings, Intuition] asks: how we feel about it what are our immediate feeling or instinctive gut reaction about it?

• Yellow [Sunshine Optimism, Optimistic response] asks: what do I like about it? what are the potential benefits?

• Green [Creative, Fertile, Growing] asks: what if…?

• Black [Discernment, Critical] asks: what is the problem with it? what would be a logical and strategic way to achieving the goal? What is feasible?

Six Thinking Hats via http://www.mindmapinspiration.com/

Exercise: Thinking together

In your workshop groups Starting with the Blue hat, explore the task you have been given: come up with a theme/proposal for the end-of-session exhibition. Then work out a way you may approach the problem using the Six Hats method.

As you move through the hats (starting with the blue hat, followed by the white), come up with additional questions (to the above) in response to the task given. Write down your answers to these questions (you can draw a diagram if you like).

Hopefully, as you work through the hats (you can go back and forth, in different order after white), you will come together in proposing a theme.

Table your theme and we will take a vote in class.

Exhibition committees formation

Following are the 4 committees that need to be formed to organise and run the end-of-session exhibition:

1. Curatorial: looks after the artworks and allocation of spaces, generally how the artworks are exhibited.

2. Technical: looks after the equipment (allocation) and installing of the works or stipulating guidlines (e.g. deadlines).

3. Public relations: makes the exhibition known to interested parties, stakeholders, general public etc.

4. Catering and event: looks after the running of the event itself such as the opening and later if the exhibition runs over a few days the manning of the venue.

Nominate yourself into a committee that you are interested in working in. Gather, meet and discuss your following:

1. Goals: What is your purpose?

2. Roles: Who needs to do what?

3. Procedures: How are we going to achieve our goals?

4. Relationships: How will we communicate? How will we support each other in completing the task?

Post an entry to the subject’s blog that:

• Define your tasks (what areas are you look after)

• Define your roles (for example, who should a student approach and for what)

• Define your procedures (including information you may require from participating students, deadlines).

Self Directed Project/Practice Consults.

MICROGALLERIES (NOWRA) LIVE STREET ART, MUSIC + VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Micro-Galleries-Opening-Night-BYO-Junk-Mail-Chris-Anderson1496355_889270281119519_9201771850603216326_o


From May 8 2015 the streets of Nowra CBD and its laneways will come to life, with a mix of local Shoalhaven, national and overseas artists as part of the international art project Micro Galleries: Changing the World…in small and creative ways.The event will kick off with a huge opening weekend (8-10 May) with activities ranging from projection installations, an interactive pop-up arts space, seven free walking tours led by performance artists, symposiums, coffee convos with the artists, live micro performances and workshops.
It’s all FFEE, see http://microgalleries.org/events/nowra-australia-baby/ to find out more or sign up for one of tours, find out more about the artists, or just grab a map and meander through town.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED – GET INVOLVED!

– Assist with street art tours
– Help artists paste up and install works
– Play records and spin tunes
– Supervise pop up space
– Facilitate artists talks in pop up space

Contact: Bonnie Greene
bonnie@ruedelarocket.com

Week 8 : Guest Lecture- Dr Lucas Ihlein and a Workshop full of Making

 

A document from The Yeoman’s Project blog a project by Lucas Ihlein and IanMillis

Today Dr Lucas Ihlein has been generous enough to volunteer to come and talk to us about the development and sustain of his practice.

Perhaps more than any of the artists Lucas’s work is concerned is made of process and relation and so he has really had to focus on the relation between art process, practice, and its artefacts or objects.

He very neatly describes his work thusly,

Lucas Ihlein is an artist who works with social relations and communication as the primary media of his creative practice. (http://lucasihlein.net)

Image form the Bon Scott Blog…

Luca’s work is part Activist, Environmental ,Social,  Aesthetic, and certainly Research – but its the dialogue that he sets up between those that makes his work particularly interesting. I certainly found myself think about those Biotypes when I was looking over his catalogue….the relation  between Art and the Civic is a particularly interesting aspect of Lucas’s practice.

He has really pioneered the notion of Blogging as Art and particularly the method of Bilateral Blogging  – which is the subject of his award winning doctoral thesis which you can find here 

or you can read a shorter journal article describing bilateral blogging here

I highly recommend you have a look at;

the Yeoman’s project which was exhibited to much acclaim at the New South Wales Gallery.
the Bon Scott Blog and much more listed here.

 


Oh nose! Lucas has cancelled at late notice…. here is my hastily put together Alt.

 Plan, plan, plan.

Austin Kleon’s ‘Shut up and Write a Book’ (http://austinkleon.com/2013/03/21/shut-up-and-write-the-book-5-things-that-have-helped-me-recently/)

In week 9 8, we begin to plan in ernest. We devote our time to look at and test out some strategies for planning.

We draw up some mud maps for personal development in terms of projects, practice, and career. As well, we discuss and trial some organisation architecture as we begin to work together as a group towards a common goal (of the end-of-session exhibition).

Process vs. Product

Last week we spent some time talking about the idea of process vs. product and how market economy impacts on this relationship and how we perceive their importance. It is worthwhile thinking about how the social, economical, and cultural frameworks we operate within (ideas of investment and returns, or commodities and currencies, for example) influence the way we learn and teach.

Following are some examples I borrowed from Austin Kleon’s Tumblr blog: Think Process not Product:

[Sketches from El Bulli’s Kitchen]


[Cartoonist Drew Dernavich planning his work]


[Nick Cave’s studio from while producing the Bad Seeds’ album Let Love In, Images of his notebook and dictionary]

[Writer, Mary Karr’s planning the outline of a new book]

[Edgar Wright’s early plan for The World’s End]

[Children books illustrator, Oliver Jaffer’s workspace]

Discussion:

In these examples, what is the relationship between process, product, and practice?

Richard Sennet was noted to say ’no art without craft’, can we extend that to say ’no product without process’?  What does this mean?

Sometimes these forms overlap and cross over. Think about journals or blogs that document process, can they be products (or commodities)? Think about Da Vinci’s notebooks, what contribute to their values (monetary or otherwise)?

Questions:

Think back to your Practices Project (your process, your summary and reflection, and the feedbacks and comments.

Can you see a shape of your process? Describe your typical creative process — what are the tools you use to plan: maps, charts, sketches, googledocs, excel documents?

Are there common hurdles? What do you frequently get stuck on?

What are some of the feedback or comments that you were given that make you uncomfortable, or push you towards an unfamiliar zone?

How do we foster ’organic evolution’ or account for ’irrational development’?

Austin Kleon’s -The Life of a Project (http://41.media.tumblr.com/ddda721acabb839724280c7b9d9f4c95/tumblr_ney6ezjCoL1qz6f4bo1_1280.jpg)

Planning and process

To plan, first let’s start with you as an individual.

Exercise: 1, 5, 10 years from now…

Drawing by Austin Kleon (http://austinkleon.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/poster-2-500×666.gif)

Fold a blank piece of A3 paper in halves first long-wise, unfold, then fold it short-wise. You will have 4 rectangles.

1. In the first rectangle, draw a picture of yourself/ your practice now: what you do, your current context (for example, at uni, doing an internship), skills you have, any specialised areas.

2. In the adjacent rectangle, draw a picture of you/ your practice in 12 months’ time. This is where you want to

be in 12 months’ time (for example working in a particular industry, making particular works).

3. Similarly, in the 2 remaining rectangles, draw pictures of you/ your practice in 5 then 10 years’ time. These portraits can include other facets of your life such as family and other ambitions such as travel, working overseas etc.

In pairs, discuss you plans with each other. Outline where you are now and where you want to go/ be. Then discuss how you might get to these goals.

Refer back to your Gemeinschaft map (from week 8), can you see any resources, tools, or pathways that may potentially help you to achieve these goals?

As the respondent, ask questions to get a deeper understanding of your peer’s goals (hopes and dreams). Think carefully, what would be useful advice to give your peer?

Working together

Richard Sennett’s Diplomacy of the everyday :

• Dialogic – build on differences, open up new possibilities

• Subjunctive – active listening

• Empathic – acknowledge perspectives

Exercise: Knowing your peers and working with them

Break into groups of 6. On an A3 piece of paper, draw a table/ circle/ square/ rectangle to represent your group. Draw a profile (pictorial, textual, or otherwise) of each group member in terms of his/ her practice, areas of interests/study/ skills.

Research different organisation structures, collaborative architecture, working models (e.g. hierarchy, centralised, distributed, hub and spokes, networked, etc.). Draw diagrams of each model and discuss the types of situations each model may work best works in (what kind of tasks for example). What may be the best structure for your group?

Edward De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats

• Blue [Cool, Controlled, Analytical, Managing] asks: what is the subject? what are we thinking about? what isthe goal? what is our approach to this task?

White [Objective, Facts, Figures, Information] asks: what do we know about the subject/ task? what are the facts?

Red [Emotions, Feelings, Intuition] asks: how we feel about it what are our immediate feeling or instinctive gut reaction about it?

• Yellow [Sunshine Optimism, Optimistic response] asks: what do I like about it? what are the potential benefits?

• Green [Creative, Fertile, Growing] asks: what if…?

• Black [Discernment, Critical] asks: what is the problem with it? what would be a logical and strategic way to achieving the goal? What is feasible?

Six Thinking Hats via http://www.mindmapinspiration.com/

Exercise: Thinking together

In your workshop groups Starting with the Blue hat, explore the task you have been given: come up with a theme/proposal for the end-of-session exhibition. Then work out a way you may approach the problem using the Six Hats method.

As you move through the hats (starting with the blue hat, followed by the white), come up with additional questions (to the above) in response to the task given. Write down your answers to these questions (you can draw a diagram if you like).

Hopefully, as you work through the hats (you can go back and forth, in different order after white), you will come together in proposing a theme.

Table your theme and we will take a vote in class.

Exhibition committees formation

Following are the 4 committees that need to be formed to organise and run the end-of-session exhibition:

1. Curatorial: looks after the artworks and allocation of spaces, generally how the artworks are exhibited.

2. Technical: looks after the equipment (allocation) and installing of the works or stipulating guidlines (e.g. deadlines).

3. Public relations: makes the exhibition known to interested parties, stakeholders, general public etc.

4. Catering and event: looks after the running of the event itself such as the opening and later if the exhibition runs over a few days the manning of the venue.

Nominate yourself into a committee that you are interested in working in. Gather, meet and discuss your following:

1. Goals: What is your purpose?

2. Roles: Who needs to do what?

3. Procedures: How are we going to achieve our goals?

4. Relationships: How will we communicate? How will we support each other in completing the task?

Post an entry to the subject’s blog that:

• Define your tasks (what areas are you look after)

• Define your roles (for example, who should a student approach and for what)

• Define your procedures (including information you may require from participating students, deadlines).

Workshop.

Today I will give you a break. No more lecturing during workshops. I pinky promise…

A few notes though:

In week 9 we will work organisation for the end of year exhibit. Please make sure you are here. The lecture will be about techniques of collaboration and critical thinking. We will then organise groups and responsibilities and give the event some shape. We have set the date of the ‘Opening’ or ‘Event’ for the evening of Wednesday the 24th of June.

Self-directed projects presentation

In weeks 10&11, you will present the concepts, research, and trials of self-directed projects to class. Presenta-tion and critique sessions will be conducted in 4 groups of 7 over in weeks 10 and 11. This is the opportunity where you will be able to present your ideas to you peers (and tutors) and receive feedbacks. Please read the assessment outline carefully to find out what is asked of you. Your final work (exhibited) as well as a 750-word blog summary (with documentation of the work) will be assessed.

Have a look at these assessment criteria:

• The quality of the creative-experimental work in terms of its conceptual sophistication, technical execution and engagement with the chosen medium

•The appropriateness of the mode of exhibition (engagement with context, audience interaction, display and presentation techniques)

• The technical quality of the exhibition (how well crafted are all the material and technological elements of the work?)

• The evolution of the work documented in the compulsory weekly blog entries.

• The quality of reflection on progress embodied in the blog summary.

In the presentation, you will be expected to address aspect of the first 2 criteria. Presentation of your research and conceptual engagement here is important. A feedback sheet will be provided up for an exercise in peer assessment during these presentations.

Presentation Order for weeks 10 & 11 will be drawn up and posted before week 10’s class.

Today: 

I’ve marked and commented on all your projects. I’d like to chat with each of you individually about where you see yourself progressing form this point on and to go over the feedback with you.

While that is going on you’ll be working on the Collaborative video project that we didn’t get to last week and working on and discussing you biotypes map (this wasn’t done well – because I rushed it)..

a.What is your works relationship to the Civic (does it have a social function, what is its ethic/ethos).
Who does your work serve and how? What does it do?
b.What is your works relation to the Market (and market forces – how can you negotiate them without compromising a.).
c. What social aspect does your have and how does it acquire it. Who keeps you honest? What social forces and architectures modulate the production of your work?
d. What the relationship between recreation and art? Is your work recreational, professional, or amateur. Who and what defines your domestic art space?

When you’ve done that;

Begin ideas map and research on self-directed work.

Reposting Collaborative Video Task;

Exercise 2: Exquisite Corpse Videos

The Exquisite Corpse is a surrealist parlour game often adapted as a collaborative art project. You may also want to find examples where this Surrealist parlour game have been adapted to other forms and media.

Mystery Objects at Noon by Thai filmmaker, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, is an example.

With your group develop a set of rules for shooting a collaborative video project in sequential sections. The rules should provide for an opening onto ‘other people’s minds’ while at the same time resulting in a ‘coherent’ piece of video when edited together. No member is allowed to watch more than the last ten seconds of the video – and this should provide the basis for shooting the next section or cut.

Keep each section to a length of 30 seconds.

 

 

 

 

Week 7: Practice, Ecologies, Communities.

 

Index of cards and signs for Zorn’s Game Piece Cobra

Last week I encouraged you to think through the possibilities/potential for what I referred to as an ecological approach to your media art practice.

Recall this happy quote;

Life is an island here and now in a dying world… We are but whirlpools in a river of ever flowing water. We are not the stuff that abides, but patterns that perpetuate themselves (Weiner 1973: 23, 25-7 cited n Harries-Jones 1995: 108)

Lets keep it in mind. We all recognised Csíkszentmihályi’s description of the state of ‘flow’.

We largely concurred that the state of flow involved an interesting relationship between agency and what we might call our becoming.

More concretely flow seemed to involve a forgetting of the self that led to its subsequent enhancement – a feeling of becoming more than what we were.

Here is Csíkszentmihályi grappling with that relationship where he talks about differentiation and integration -the two forces he says are at the core of the experience of flow states;

‘Flow helps to integrate the self…when the flow episode is over, one feels more more “together” than before, not only internally, but also in respect to other people and to the in general’

(Csíkszentmihályi 1990: 41)

and later;

‘The self becomes more complex as a result of experiencing flow. Paradoxically it is when we act freely, for the sake of action itself rather than for ulterior motives , that we learn to become more than what we were’(42)

Discussion:

The rhetoric is interesting when we pull it apart – where does agency fit in here? How is this itself of an action related to the self that Csíkszentmihályi talks about above – the  ‘I’….

In the experiences and practices of the artists we’ve looked at (Close) or whom have come to us (Priest and Healey) can you recall instances of play between ‘action itself’ and the subject self?

Can you recall instances where you succeeded in pursuing ‘action for itself’, did this involve a conflict with other forces of subjectivity (Ulterior Motives)? Where and when have Ulterior motives got in the way of pursuing ‘action for itself’ 0 what were they and what dynamic did this involve?

Returning to Turrell.

Ganzfeld (2014) @ the NGA

Last week I suggested my ongoing obsession with the practice of James Turrell had something to do with the integrity and vitality of a sustained/sustainable practice.

Integrity and Vitality are big terms – Integrity is very value laden when used in moral discourse – but we can also think of integrity in purely structural terms; the integrity of building, the integrity of vessel, the integrity of a organism. Vitality is simply the quality of life, or liveliness.

As we saw last week with reference to Gregory Bateson Vitality is ‘the living thing’s way of staying in the game’ – of sustaining a continuity – and in this sense Integrity involves adapting, marshalling and harnessing ecological forces and flows  – it involves as Csíkszentmihályi discusses an ongoing process of differentiation and integration.

Perhaps think these terms concretely – continuity requires a differentiation from the flow and an integration of its potential. 

Our challenge is to locate this source of this ‘structural integrity’ and vitality in Adcock’s excellent account of Turrell’s early practice. As I’ve repeatedly said this aim might be served by using the perspective this question indicates;

what is the process of which these works are an artefact of? what characterises that process in specific and concrete terms?

Adcock on Turrell via google books

Overall Questions: 

  • What defined and determined the development of Turrell’s early practice?
  • Can you track its development through the reading?

and once again;

what is the process of which these works are an artefact of? what characterises that process in specific and concrete terms?

While you are reading/researching:

  • Mark the points the practice ‘turns around’.
  • What characteristics or events distinguish the development of each particular phase of his practice
  • Is there one question that drives this instance of practice or defines a particular expression of it? Do these questions or interests shift and how?

In groups look for: 

Turrell’s early use of flame at the bottom of page 5-6.

Afrum-proto : page 6

Drop out/Mendota Hotel? page 7

Cross Projection Pieces? (Sculptural, Architectural?) bottom of 8 top of 12.

Illusion? Bottom of 12 top of 13.

Single-Wall Projections Architectural? page 16 (middle paragraph and onward)

Punching Holes – Ondoe > Ashby. page 19

The end of Single Wall Projections – second half of page 23

Shallow Space Constructions- Raemer > Rayzor > Kung 28-29.

The Mendota Stoppages.  80-82 (Beyond the Reading but important).

Try and find images for any work or series of work that are discussed.

Be able to describe the work to another group. 

Conceptual Speed Dating…

As you move around the  room describe the works, elements, or events of Turrell’s practice you’ve discovered/researched.

Work out how the elements/events/works are related?

What do the phases of work have in common?

How do they differ (concretely/materially and conceptually)?
How do these common or differing aspects direct us to a developing practice?
What is the nature of that practice?
How has it developed over time?

Remember our guiding questions:

What defined and determined the development of Turrell’s early practice?

and more importantly;

What is the process of which these works are an artefact of? what characterises that process in specific and concrete terms?

More Discussion:

Perhaps a vital practice speaks and a dilligent artist listens.

What would it mean in for your own practice to shift from a practice of speaking to one of listening? To take an ecological approach to your practice?

Cleary describe your practice as a single research question? Write it down discuss what it might mean to pursue it – what processes does it indicate.

Gemeinschaft and Community of Peers

[The Peasant Wedding by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1568]

In the remainder of this session, you will propose and produce a self-directed work. This work will be formally exhibited in the DMC gallery spaces. The event of the exhibition will be organised, curated, and ran by you collaboratively as a group.

This will involve working with each other closely in an organised and collaborative fashion. Over the next weeks you will decide on how that organisation and collaboration will proceed. It really is completely up to you how we do this – and I’d like you to think about how we innovate and explore the potential of exhibiting as an architecture of collaboration and of thought rather than just as an outcome or vehicle for promotion or presentation (it might be that as well of course).

IMG_0121 IMG_0120

We have all of week 2 of the exams week booked into the gallery space. We need to use some time for bumping in, iteration improvement, we normally would have some kind of opening/closing or event. I need two days for marking. We need to begin by agreeing on these dates and fixing them. Do we need a theme? How can we make the event useful?  How can we get the most out of the work we install? How should we position this event? Who should we invite? And of course the most pressing question what food will be served? Are there more important questions to ask first?

Keep these in mind for next week.

More importantly your work will hopefully develop according to a process of collaboration over the coming weeks. Our aim should be to help each other put on the best exhibition we can. This involves taking responsibility for each others works as much as for your own.

This will involve a lot of listening-to and consideration-of your community of peers if its going to work successfully…but what do we mean by that…

We will start this process in earnest next week..for now..

…our aim now is to take our new found notion of an ecology of art practice and an ecological approach to art practice and consider its relation to concepts of Gemeinschaft (community of peers) and collaboration.

Obviously we can’t think ecologically about our art practice (with any integrity) without considering other people that populate and interrupt its flows…. and what more potentially effective for of difference and differentiation than ‘other people’s minds’.

IMG_0118

In fact Philosopher and Theorist Brian Massumi suggests that because we ‘always find ourselves in the middle of things’, because even the way we see the world is always a product of our perception, the only real ‘outside’ of thinking/feeling going on is other people’s minds. 

(Massumi 2002, 188)

Gemeinschaft

German sociologist, Ferdinand Tönnies , coined the term, Gemeinschaft, commonly translated as ’community’— within which your position is defined by your personal relationship with others. This is a place where everyone knows everyone’s name.

This concept is in opposition to Gesellschaft , society, where your role or position is defined typically by labour relation. These are first and foremost concepts that are used to explore changing social relations in modern society.

They are not necessarily realistic descriptions of what is experienced in communities and societies.

Questions:

Can you think of examples of Gemeinschaft you may belong to?
Who are the other members of this group?
What connect you as a group?

The Artist’s biotopes

In ’Artistic Praxis and the Neoliberalization of the Educational Space’, Pascal Gielen  argues that there are four domains that help foster and shape the relationship between practice and theory in the development of artistic practice –

Gielen first tells a story about the essential relation between theory and practice – or praxis – which is the way theory is enacted or embodied in practice. Gielen speaks of a practice as ‘thriving with theory’ and vice versa when the balance is optimal – the optimisation requires a careful balance between these domains and the way they each afford different dynamics of praxis – of the interaction between theory and practice.

1. Domestic

http://photography-now.de/pn/Bilder/Bilder/gross/T03093B001500.jpg
[from Happy Victims by Kyoichi Tsuzuki, 1999-2002]

This domain is mainly constituted by family members and close friends. The main function of the domestic biotope is a safe place where the artist can develop, experiment, and ’dare to act ridiculous in jest’. The space allows one to work with one’s own rhythm, the mode is tranquil and intimate. Gielen writes: It is the domain of the improvised clubhouse where people play on imaginary guitars or sing together, even out of tune; where they dance and perform plays for one another […] The domestic space guarantees a certain ’slowability’, which is necessary in order to incorporate complex theoretical insights. It might also involve those personal moments and spaces that aren’t simply domestic – ‘whenever an artist reads a book in all tranquility and intimacy or writes on his computer on a train//whenever the artist develops himself and his work- for example- by reading an essay or a detailed analysis of an image – he finds concentration for theory that only the intimacy of the the domestic space offers (61) – This domain allows for playful experimentation and games and ‘the tranquility necessary for building theoretical knowledge

2. Communal space, Peers, or Gemeinschaft

[Cunningham in rehearsal with dancers, by Mark Seliger]

This is the domain of the classroom, workshop, rehearsal room where one interacts with fellow students, colleagues, and peers. The social interaction between individuals allows theoretical insights to be tested, confronted, and experimented upon. Gielen writes: Within the community, social interactions centre on the ’entire personality’ of an artist and face-to-face relationships. What matters is not only the one specific thing one is good at, but also one’s character, communicative skills, ’empathic ability’, and in some cases even one’s appearance, scent, manner of

speech and movement […] Through social interaction an artistic oeuvre [practice] can ripen within this space, and tried out in a an early stage within a social context. The reflectivity which is gained its professional, and in this respect it differs from solitary meditation or try-outs in front of non-professionals within a domestic space.

Gielen writes that in this domain;

‘the acquisition of theoretical insights acquires a social character , which also makes it easier (than in the domestic space) to disagree and confront. In the best case, this space generates a climate that is conducive to research enlarging the scope of what is artistically possible.

3. Market space


[A Medieval Market Street (from the Gouvernement des Princes)]

This is the space where the creative product can be exchanged for money. This space is governed by economic transactions;

‘here it is possible to totally alienate from one’s products without any problem…any creative good can be exchanged for money’

Theory on the one hand, may well gain the status of marketing, and concepts serve to gain or keep a distinguished position on the market. The practice on the other hand, is only interesting when the product is finished, for only then can it be traded. The process of making the product has little value in this domain.

4. Civic

This is the space where creative work is displayed, exhibited, screened and received by members of the public. The interaction between individuals, groups, and works are complex. The civic space then can also be a place of true confrontation or dissensus. For the art world it is the space of art theory, art criticism, debate and public policy evaluations of subsidy cases or political discussions […] The civil zone is closely linked to the artistic community through artistic communication and theoretical discourse […] in this space theory becomes a public good;

‘within the civil domain public legitimisation is crucial…’ and so theory and praxis interact at the policy, cultural discourse, and the function of art, thought and ideas within civil society and civilisation generally.

Questions:

Think of each of these biotopes or spaces described. Describe what these spaces are like for you. You may want to map this space in terms of people, entities, organisations, who belong to the domains, or even the physical spaces you may associate with each of the biotopes. Describe and discuss the type things you tend to do in each of these spaces in terms of your practice in these biotopes.

Specifically, consider how these spaces may allow you to develop your practice. How is your practice currently situated within these biotypes – I readily admit mine gets stuck in the domestic…where ‘one may bricoler or tinker endlessly’… how might you better balance these domains in the service of optimising praxis?

Working together/ cooperation

llustration from Diderot’s Encyclopaedia

In Richard Sennett’s Together: The Ritual, Pleasures and Politics of Cooperation, he argues that cooperation is not a natural endowment waiting to be expressed, but a set of skills that can be and needs to be learnt. Specifically, he argues neo-liberal capitalism contributes to the de-skilling of people in cooperation.

Pleasure of cooperation

List the value/worth of cooperation/collaboration?

Craft of everyday diplomacy – some tools for demanding or complex cooperation:

Next week we will look at methodology for exploring these different tools today its probably just a start to note their differences…and to not there potential antagonisms.

That might be useful in understanding these differences a protological – that is for cooperation/collaboration to work we need to agree on a protocol for that interaction.

1.Dialectic vs Dialogic

Dialectic – conflictual model based on displacement, arrival, consummation; thesis, anti-thesis, synthesis

Dialogic – non-resolved interaction within the framework of conversation; becoming a skilled listener; listening is a skill that can be developed, allowing you to unpack what is not said and to respond process vs product.

2. Declarative vs Subjunctive

Declarative – ’I believe’. ’I think’, ’I am convinced’; assertions that extinguish others

Subjunctive – ’I would have thought’, ’I thought it would be helpful to’; removing the foreclosure of declara-tions; creating a space through ambiguity

3. Sympathy vs Empathy

Sympathy – ’I feel your pain’; identification with another’s pain by putting yourself in their place; others as mirrors.

Empathy – Register that something matters to another that you can recognise even though you cannot put yourself in their place

Questions:

What role do you usually play in team or group work?

Do you tend to toward one or the other in each of these pairings? How does that effect your potential to work with a group?

What are some of the common difficulties you have experienced when working in a group/ team?

Can you think of situations where one or more of these tactics may be useful in creating a more workable relationship?

Workshop:  Collaborations

Example of dialogue in project, Slowing Down Time, 2014

Slowing Down Time is a collaborative project by four artists working with different media: textile, sculpture, choreography, installation, animation, and moving image. The project started with one work by one artist and evolved over the 4-week period as a new contribution was added each week. These responses culminated in a richly textured and layered work in the fourth and final week of the exhibition. The artists are Louise Curham, Michele Elliot, Jo Law, and Sue Healey. In common for the four artists is attentiveness to the materiality of everyday life such as gestures, domestic scenes, threads, clothes, hair, and furniture. Each iteration responded to the previous, materialistically building on what is there. The project’s ambition was to open up a dialogic space for artist to create works together. The aim was to produce a final piece with diverse parts that

are consonant with each other—a reflective space where time is slowed down.

Slowing Down Time (2014)

Example: John Zorn

Often alternative/artistic architectures of collaboration deliberately attempt to shake-up and augment the potential of active collaboration – so that collaboration takes on the structure of a game with rules and instruction for interacting.

The Game Pieces are a series of compositional works that applied game-like rules to produce ‘controlled improvisation’. Zorn positions himself as ‘game master’ and uses a series of cards and other systems to prompt and tag/designate improvisation from and between chosen musicians. Other performing musician compete for thematic or tonal control according to set rules of engagement. The game pieces often imposed limits on the performers – perhaps limiting them to a very restricted palette of sounds (Hockey 1980) or ensuring control (and potential interruption) over the length of an improvised section never allowed a habitual use of refrains or phrases (Cobra 1984).

The rules/architecture of the piece tend to force the musician (and the artist/composer) into an active and ongoing listening – rather than a determined expression.

We can see in the Zorn example and elsewhere how different models and architectures of collaboration enable an opening onto a creative difference. How might we build effective, speculative or otherwise interesting architectures or processes of collaboration or collective improvisation …How we might we use new/digital/networked

media to do so?

______

The following 2 exercises can be done concurrently. Exercise 2 is carried out sequentially in groups of 5, work on exercise 1 while you are waiting.

Exercise 1: Create maps of your biotopes in relation to your practice or work —domestic space, community of peers, market place, and civic space. You may want to map this space in terms of people, entities, organisations, who belong to the domains, or even the physical spaces you may associate with each of the biotopes.

In pairs, describe to one another what these spaces are like for you. Discuss the type things you tend to do in each of these spaces in terms of your practice in these biotopes. Specifically, consider how these spaces may allow you to develop your practice. Post to subject blog.

Exercise 2: Exquisite Corpse Videos

The Exquisite Corpse is a surrealist parlour game often adapted as a collaborative art project. You may also want to find examples where this Surrealist parlour game have been adapted to other forms and media.

Mystery Objects at Noon by Thai filmmaker, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, is an example.

With your group develop a set of rules for shooting a collaborative video project in sequential sections. The rules should provide for an opening onto ‘other people’s minds’ while at the same time resulting in a ‘coherent’ piece of video when edited together. No member is allowed to watch more than the last ten seconds of the video – and this should provide the basis for shooting the next section or cut.

Keep each section to a length of 30 seconds.

Task:

Begin ideas map and research on self-directed work.

Post this to your blog as well.