Lecture 12: Future Cinemas

Through this lecture series, we frequently visited the question of medium specificity, namely, what is the materiality of the mediums and media we work with. What are the characteristics of each of these media? What are the textures of these technologies? Throughout this journey, we tease out points and events in history that come together to present a picture of experimental moving image practice. We argue that experimentation is the key to answering these questions and opening up new possibilities.

In this last lecture, we summarise the terrain covered in this subject, and asks, once again: what is the significance of experimental practice today? Specifically, with the power that remains with the moving image? What should screen media be used for? And how should it be used?

Download Lecture Slides: MEDA201_2018_Lecture12

Workshop 12: Project Progress


[Joana Moll, AZ: The Archive, 2011-4, installed view at ISEA 2016 Cultural R>evolution exhibition]
In this week’s workshop, we will aim to finalise all spatial requirements and allocate everyone a location for showing your works for assessment on Tuesday 14th June.

We will continue with the planning and testing we began in previous weeks: (production work flow, space allocation, equipment need, installation and final presentation). It’s also a chance to discuss with your tutor the progress of your work.

During this week’s workshop, do one or more of the following:

  • conduct testing relevant to your project (especially, projection works)
  • create content (e.g. editing, photography, animation)
  • go on a ‘reckkie’ (reconnaissance) to collect test shots etc.
  • research on relevant artworks that will help contextualise and inform your project

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Workshop 11: Project Development, Planning and Testing

In week 11’s workshop, you will be given time to develop your major project. Use this time to discuss your work-in-progress with your tutor by showing them tests, edits, sketches and roughs. Remember: you need to be discussing actual work-in-progress and not just talk about ideas or plans.

Take the opportunity in class to make the work creating rough edits, making a proof-of-concepts/ prototypes or testing the gear using the available space and equipment. Continual material research (working with technical gear and materials) is a key part of project development. This is an iterative process through which the work will develop.

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W12: Reading, Writing, Planning

This week’s reading:
Round Table: The Projected Image in Contemporary Art
Malcolm Turvey, Hal Foster, Chrissie Iles, George Baker, Matthew Buckingham and Anthony McCall
October, Vol. 104 (Spring, 2003), pp. 71-96
The MIT Press – http://www.jstor.org/stable/3397582

Please read it prior to class and answer the following questions:
1) Which discussion theme/topic raised in the article is most relevant to the project you are working on?
2) The discussion occurred in 2002, what issues or questions would you add to a contemporary context?

 

 

11: SCREEN, PROJECTION, DISPLAY

MEDIA ARTS RESOURCE
http://www.eai.org/resourceguide/exhibition/singlechannel/basicquestions.html

Basic Questions

Technology-based, reproducible, and variable, media art poses unique challenges for the exhibitor. Exhibition strategies and standards for media art are constantly in flux as artistic practices evolve, technology develops, and viewing contexts change. However, one can identify basic professional protocols, guidelines, and definitions that will assist in ensuring that video artworks are exhibited with respect for the artists and the integrity of the works, whether they are part of a major museum exhibition or a cinematic screening. Sometimes the most fundamental questions are the most important ones to ask. What kinds of playback and display equipment are recommended? What is the preferred format for exhibiting video in a gallery and why? What format is best for a theatrical screening? And what do you really mean when you say “single-channel video“? The answers to these and the other basic but crucial questions below might be seen as a starting point for demystifying the process.

10: WORD CRIMES

UOW Libraryhttps://www.library.uow.edu.au/index.html

Author-date (Harvard) reference guide: http://uow.libguides.com/refcite/uowharvard
*download the complete guide at the bottom of the screen for more detailed information

Arts, English and Media database guides:
Visual Arts, Graphic Design & Photography – https://uow.libguides.com/aem/visual-arts
Communication & Media – https://uow.libguides.com/aem/communication-media

Teach yourself research guide: http://uow.libguides.com/teach-yourself/searching

Lecture 11: Old Media New Media

Throughout the lecture series, we examined types of screen media technologies: film, video, digital media, by breaking down them into ‘essential’ elements: light, dark, electronic signals, patterns, pixels and so on as basic units that make these media specific and unique. Experimenting with these elements allow their textures to emerge/ appear.    

However, we have also moved away from Clement Greenburg’s argument that “It is by virtue of its medium that each art is unique and strictly itself. To restore the identity of an art the opacity of its medium must be emphasised.”   

In this lecture, we continue with the proposition that screen has become an intermedia form. Its historical and contemporary practices harbour the potential to expand and create new possibilities and new cinematic forms. We will do so by exploring old media and new media.

Lecture 10: Artist’s Cinema

In the final part of our lecture series, we speculate on the future of cinema. This lecture takes this inquiry into the concept of ‘the artist’s cinema’ – exploring the intersection between cinema and art.  Based on the premise that wider accessibility of media technologies has enabled an intermedial mode of practice, we argue that screen media has the potential to open up conventional cinematic forms and introduces different possibilities. We will examine the return to the cinematic by looking at ‘the place of artist’s cinema’ in contemporary culture. We ask two pivotal questions: how does the moving image shape our experience of the personal? and what kind of power does the image possess?

Download Lecture Slides: MEDA201_2018_Lecture10_small

Workshop 10: Major Project Presentations and Planning

Testing projection of final work

In the week 10 workshop, you will present your concept for your major project to class. This will give you an opportunity to present your research and conceptual development. Use this forum to test out your ideas and solicit feedback. In particular, you will want to show the artwork/ practice that you are responding and your research materials. You may also want to bring other support material to show (sketches, diagrams etc) to talk through your ideas. Your presentation should be around 10 to 15 minutes including questions and feedback. Your presentation, while not assessable, will be taken into account in the final assessment of the major project.

Please read the project outline carefully to ensure what is required for the assignment.

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09: THIRD MEANING

JOHN AKOMFRAH (b. 1957 Ghana)

 

 

 

 

NOTES:

  • Practice: (1) don’t wait, (2) there are no mistakes, (3) receptive to possibilities
  • Montage: juxtaposition, bricolage, bring together fragments, the third meaning – dialectic, new meaning emerges from collision
  • Archive / library / collection / historical expanse – memory, mortality, image as immortality, surplus of fictions, intervention, regimes of representation
  • Inspiration: Tarkovsky – ‘border (limits) of cinema’, Stuart Hall – archive, post-colonialism
  • Transmedia context: cinema/TV/gallery – each zone has its own demands, be clear / courage to name germinations, sculpt forms of address as transformations
  • Social commentary
  • Migration: crossing seas/refugee-ship/death, diaspora, origins
  • Cinematic tropes: montage, time-remapping, dramatic re-enactment
  • Multi-screen: proximity, simultaneity, dialogue, association rather than counterpoint, reflections, emergence, dramaturgy/construct
  • Location / place

 

KADER ATTIA (b. 1970, France/Algeria)

Kader Attia, J’Accuse 2016, teak, steel rebar, single-channel digital video, projection, colour, sound, installation view, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne © the artist. Photograph: Andrew Curtis

Attia explores ideas around cultural exchange and the complex relationship between non-Western cultures and Europe, after decolonisation, through his art. – https://www.mca.com.au/artists-works/exhibitions/759-kader-attia/
NOTES:
  • Memory/amnesia, past/future
  • Images and memory
  • Immigration, in-between space, journey
  • Exhibition as statement
  • ‘Charged’ objects, wunderkammer
  • Repair, injury, fixing, evolution, mimicry, destruction, fragmentation, untold stories, successions of states
  • Broken object, repaired object, tradition / modernity
  • Politics and poetry, ethic of art
  • Paradox – veil of illusion, chaos
  • La Colonie – cafe / agora / workshops / conference, public discursive space, gap between representation and the act
GRAD SHOW COORDINATOR: STEPHANIE BEAUPARK sb924@uowmail.edu.au