Workshop 13: Review and Final details

In the final week of exploring Tangible Media, we will continue to focus on project development. This is the last opportunity for you to get critical feedback from your tutor. Please bring all components with you.We will devote the entire workshop to this final review.

The gallery and blackboxes will be available for testing – but please pack up all your materials and equipment after class as the spaces are needed for other subjects.
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Workshop 12: Planning and more testing!

You will be focus on planning and testing your work-in-progress in this week’s workshop. Please ensure you have your work in class to test. Black boxes will be available for use in testing any components.

Your tutors will be working on the draft space allocation in class based on the information you provide us using the Project Planning Pro forma.

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Workshop 11: Prototype Presentation

 Christian Boltanski, Shadows from the Lesson of Darkness, 1987 Installation, Sculpture, 12 oxidized copper figures, candles

Christian Boltanski, Shadows from the Lesson of Darkness, 1987 | Installation, Sculpture, 12 oxidized copper figures, candles

This week is devoted to your prototype presentation. Set up and present your prototype in the gallery space and black boxes as directed by your tutor. During the presentations, be generous to your peers by participating in the critique session. Your questions, thoughts and honest feedback can help each other build better works.

A second component of Assessment 2 is a critical reflection report which will be due on the Friday of week 11. You may also want to spend time to review artworks and theories that contextualise and inform your project to develop your artist statements.

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Week 10: Prototype Testing and Preparation

[Kuuki’s e. Menura supurba]

Assessment 2: Prototype presentation provides an opportunity to test your ideas into physical form, and to solicit response and feedback from an informed audience. Bearing in mind: one of the key concepts explored is interaction in terms of audience experience. You should be testing and examining this central idea in the prototype presentation.

This assessment has now moved to week 11, which will allow you to dedicate this week’s class (and the following mid-session break) to get your prototype up and running for the accessible presentation.

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Workshop 6: Motors, solenoids and other actuators

Week 6’s workshop introduces a number of common actuators used in circuits, with a focus on motors and solenoids. Actuators are important parts of any circuits if we were to make things move. You will be spending some time exploring the mechanisms of DC motors, server motors, and solenoids – and how they can be controlled in electronic circuits, and their possible use in media artworks. This workshop will also continue with Arduino sketches and exercises.

Tasks:

  • Research essay due in week 6.
  • Read Chapter 6 of Making Things Move by Dustyn Roberts. (This book is at the UOW library.)
  • Document all experiments using photographs/ videos and texts on you process blog/ online journal.
  • Research The Way Things Go and other similar “Rube-Goldberg Machine” or chain reaction works using objects and mechanisms.
  • Begin research on assessments 2 & 3 (project brief presented in lecture 6, to be followed with further exploration in lecture 8).

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Workshop 5: Sensor circuits, controlling inputs and outputs

In week 5’s workshop, we return to the lab to experiment with micro-controllers, circuits, and sensors. In this workshop you will be presented with a number of common sensor circuits to explore as well as the Arduino Interface Development Environment (IDE) for creating new circuits.

There will be a programming refresher/ programming basics that will introduce you to the use of Arduino with the view that you may incorporate this into your subject’s major project.

Tasks:

  • Document all experiments using photographs/ videos and texts on process blog.
  • Research on use of sensors in media art works (physical computing works) or in everyday situations.
  • Review materials to prepare/ bring to next workshop.
  • Complete Research essay.

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Week 4: Excursion to the Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences

Lindsay Kelley’s Ballistic Bundts (detailed)

In week 4, we will go on an excursion to the Powerhouse Museum (Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences) to visit three exhibitions:
Human non human
Spinning World
Common Good

We are collecting an entry fee of $6 in week 3’s class and this entry fee will allow you to visit all the exhibitions and spaces in the museum (apart from the ticketed exhibit Reigning Men).

On Tuesday 14 August, we will meet at the front of the Museum – Harris Street entrance at 11am. Direction to the museum is as follows:

The Powerhouse Museum
500 Harris Street, Ultimo

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Workshop 3: Hand-made electronics, making speakers, and audio circuits; measuring Arduino inputs

copyright Michael Myers 2009

Joyce Hinterding, Aura, 2009

In week 3’s workshop, we will get deeper into exploring the materiality of sound by creating audio speakers using some simple materials. The material exploration requiring in producing a simple device provides a direct connection to the audio medium (the mediation the physicality of sound waves). It opens up possibility of engaging with sound as a sense and as a medium. This also offers an opportunity to question the divide between digital and analogue media.

Tasks:

  1. Research on media art works discussed in class.
  2. Document all experiments using photographs/ videos and texts on process blog.
  3. Prepare for excursion by researching on the exhibitions and reviewing the worksheet (available in week 4’s post).

Research Analysis:

Luigi Russolo’s Intonarumori has been reproduced in different artworks and performances in contemporary times.

  • What is the original work about?
  • What was Russolo’s intention?
  • What does the medium of sound convey in the original Intonarumori?
  • Why do you think these instruments continue to fascinate musician and artists in contemporary times?
  • Has any of the “re-enactment” or “recreation” added further dimension to Russolo’s works?
  • If so, what are they?

Contemporary works:

Katie Paterson’s Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull, 2007

Joyce Hinterding, Aura, 2009

Pia Van Gelder, Machine/ Animal/ Vegetable, 2012

Discuss:

  1. What kind of materials and components are used to create the work?
  2. How do these different materials function together to create sounds? For example, do the physical materials function as an analogue of sound waves?
  3. If electronics are used, how do these function with physical objects to create sounds? What ideas are being explored in the work? How do electronic components contribute to this exploration?
  4. How may an audience interact with the work? What is the audience’s experience?
  5. What are the meanings derived from the use of this materials e.g. ice, graphite, vegetables?

 

Exercise 1: Making speakers

Create a speaker following instructions here:

  • Materials have been prepared for you so that you would not need to use a lighter and hot glue gun.Document your process and results.
  • Make notes on what other materials you may be able to use for a design. For example, what can be used instead of a plastic bottle? Are there other materials that can also amplify?
  • Try using a different materials such as paper, cards, or the table to amplify sound.

Exercise 2: Audio circuits

Plug the speaker you created into an audio–sensor circuit provided.

Explore this circuit and work out:

What is the trigger of the sensor?

How does change in movement or light level change the sound?

 

Exercise 3: Measuring Arduino inputs

If there is time, using the Arduino in the circuit you have, explore following these tutorial exercises:

Read Analog Voltage

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ReadAnalogVoltage

Analog In, Out Serial

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/AnalogInOutSerial

Workshop 2: Touch – Conductive and Capacitive Circuits

In response to the works and themes discussed in the second lecture, we will focus on how the sense of touch can employed in interactive works. You will explore the use of graphite and graphite paint as simple conductive materials and their capacity as material to provide connection and activation. You will be experimenting these materials in electronic circuits and these exercises will lead discussion on how different human senses can contribute to our experience of the outside world to create meanings. 
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