Week 8: Cinematography

Film still from Barry Lyndon, directed by Stanley Kubrick (1975)

Film still from Barry Lyndon, directed by Stanley Kubrick (1975)

Lecture

In week 8, we introduce the art of cinematography in narrative films. We look at the works of number of filmmakers and cinematographers including Luchino Visconti, Darius Khondji, Christopher Doyle, Clara Law, Gillian Armstrong, Andrei Tarkovsky and Stanley Kubrick. Our analysis focuses on how these images on screen create mood, convey meaning and construct a narrative space and time. We also explore the different practices used by cinematographers. The lecture argues that cinematography is an inventive endeavour where art and technology mutually transform through creative practice.

Lecture links: http://aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w8.html

Workshop

This workshop is devoted to the presentation and critique of your assessment 2 project.

Submission and presentation

  • Your final sound file needs to be uploaded to Sound Cloud, posted onto your blog with your project statement
    The link to you submission post needs to be provided as a comment to the appropriate tutorial assessment entries BEFORE your tutorial class

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Week 7: Cinematic Language and Camera Movement

Lecture

The lecture looks at the development of camera movement in conventional motion picture films. It explores how different camera movement have been used to direct and manipulate the audience’s gaze as well as express film characters’ psychological states. We examine how the cinematic language has been pushed and expanded with the experimental and innovative use of camera movement in works such as The Blair Witch Project, Being John Malkovich, Gus van Sant’s death trilogy, Richard Linklater’s Slacker and the more recent Birdman. We ask questions how can the cinematic language be further challenged by new machine vision brought about by new technologies such as Drones.

Lecture links: http://aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w7.html

Workshop

This workshop

  • examines the differences between composing for stills and movement
  • analyses how conventional cinematic language conveys different meanings through the use of camera movements
  • introduces storyboarding as technique to bring together

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Week 6: Cinematic Sound

Still from Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg (1975)

Still from Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg (1975)

Lecture

This lecture explores the use of sound in conventional cinema. It focuses on the use of diegetic sound versus non-diegetic sounds in delivering narratives. We will examine some classic examples of mainstream cinema and trace the development of audiovisual relationship in the establishment of a cinematic language. We will also look at examples of innovation where this relationship was challenged.

Lecture links: http://www.aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w6.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • introduces how we talk about sound
  • analyses how sound is used with moving images
  • introduces the basics of audio editing

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Week 5: Sound Art

Susan Hiller's Witness (2000)

Susan Hiller’s Witness (2000)

Lecture

In this second lecture focusing on the audio medium, we explore sound art as a discrete field of practice by identifying the common characteristics and motivation behind this label. We begin with an overview of sound art beginning from the early 20th century experiments of the Italian Futurist. The lecture takes the trajectory that examines sound art through the technologies that has enabled this practice. The rationale for doing this is to show how art and technology respond to each other in a mutually transformative relationship. The lecture’s exposition aims to relate sound art to media art in its exploration and extension of experience.

Lecture links: http://aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w5.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • is devoted to the presentation and critique of assessment 1 projects
  • provides further guidelines for assessment 2 project development

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Week 4: Soundscapes

Katie Paterson's Vatnajökull (the sound of) (2007-8). Listen: http://www.katiepaterson.org/vatnajokull/#

Katie Paterson’s Vatnajökull (the sound of) (2007-8). Listen: http://www.katiepaterson.org/vatnajokull/#

http://www.katiepaterson.org/vatnajokull/#

Lecture

In week 4, we shift our focus from the creation of moving images to the role of sound in creative works. In this first lecture exploring the audio medium, we begin by asking the question: what is special about the auditory sense and by extension the audio medium. We focus on soundscape as a platform that captures experiences, specifically as conceptualised by Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer. We examine the significance of sound works by Annea Lockwood, Katie Paterson and Nigel Helyer.

Lecture links: http://www.aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w4.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • introduces Assessment 2
  • introduces the basics of working with audio through a number of listening and sound recording exercises
  • explores how the audio medium is used as a creative platform

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Week 3: Constructing Time: Continuity Editing

Lecture

This lecture looks at the one of the most fundamental components of the cinematic language: editing. It introduces the development of continuity editing in early mainstream films. It examines how multiple images are sequenced in moving image works to create different sense of temporal flow. These techniques are the grammar and syntax of the cinematic language. The lecture also gestures towards another approach to editing: discontinuity editing which will be explored further in week 9.

Week 3 Lecture links: http://aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w3.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • introduces the basics to digital non-linear editing (DNLE)
  • analyses how a continuous time is created through the sequencing of individual shots
  • provides an opportunity to make your own ‘trick films’

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Workshop Week 2

Exercise 1: Where I’m From

Read and research George Ella Lyon’s approach to making poetry inspired by one’s origins. Concoct your own list, and cast it as a piece of poetry, designed to inspire your Remoscope.

http://www.georgeellalyon.com/where.html

Exercise 2: Image Analysis

In a group of 2, select one of the following images and discuss the following:

Without looking up references online, describe the image by analysing the following:

  • Composition
  • Framing and distance (e.g. Close up)
  • Depth/ picture plane
  • Lighting
  • Colour
  • Focus/ de-focus (including the use of depth of field)
  • Material used
  • Effects (use of filters, analogue or digital manipulation etc.)

Then answer the following questions:

  • What place or space(s) is being depicted in the photograph?
  • Is the photograph part of a series?
  • What does the image remind you of? Is it referencing an existing work or visual images (e.g. a painting, a historical view, an everyday view)?
  • What kind of feelings does the image impart? In what ways do they does it do this (e.g. framing, contrast, textures,
  • What kind of concepts do they convey? How do you think these ideas are encoded/ convey in the visual images?
  • How does the material used in creating the image influence the quality of the image and how we experience it?


1. James Tylor, One Mile WA, 2014 from Postcards from the Frontier series, Box Brownie camera.


2. Ed Rusha,Standard, Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, 1962, from Twenty Six Gas Station series, Silver Gelatin Print.


3. Trent Parke, Shark Bay WA, 2006, from Welcome to Nowhere series, C-type Print.


4. Jeff Wall, The Storyteller, 1986, Silver dye bleach transparency in light box.

Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 1.58.20 pm

5. Megan Jenkinson, Morell’s island


6. Martha Rosler, Seattle Stripes, 1991 from the In the Place of the Public:Airport Series.

7. Alan Sekula, Panorama. Mid-Atlantic, November 1993, from Fish Story 1989–95.


8.Greg Girand, Shanghai Falling (Fuxing Lu Demolition), 2002 from the book Phantom Shanghai, Medium format transparency.


9. Hiroshi Sugimoto, Revolution 001, 1990, Gelatin silver print.

Gleick-Information-Excerpt-1-7 (James Gleich, The Information)

Week 2: Early Cinema/ Constructing Spaces

Film still from George Melies' Le Voyage dans la Lune (1902)

Film still from George Melies’ Le Voyage dans la Lune (1902)

Lecture

This lecture explores the camera and cinematic techniques in the early cinema of the Lumiere brothers, George Melies, Edwin Porter, and D. W. Griffin. It compares the construction of spaces in film by first examining the late 19th century photographic works of Eugene Atget. We trace the development of the cinematic language in delineating space on screen from the stationary shots of the Lumiere brothers. We explore the construction of narrative space in film works by Yasujiro Ozu.

Week 2 Lecture links: http://www.aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w2.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • Provides an understanding of spatial construction on an image medium
  • Guides your project development
  • Develop your skills to shoot using manual settings on a DSLR

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Week 1: Why Study Media Arts?

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 4.08.11 pm

This first lecture presents an overview on media art history, context, and practice. We begin by introducing the media art program, establishing the subject’s aims, outcomes, structure, content, projects and expectations. We then ask a number of questions that will guide us through the subject: What is media arts? How do we approach media art as a field of knowledge and practice? And why are these the most important questions you can ask today?

Week 1 lecture slides URL: http://www.aaronlburton.com/uowmeda101w1.html

Workshop

This workshop:

  • provides an overview to MEDA101 workshops
  • provides an introduction to Assessment 1
  • activates project (assessment 1)
  • covers basic DSLR skills for shooting moving image.

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